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President Trump tweets a lot. With tens of millions of followers on Twitter, Trump proposes policy, shares his latest actions and reacts to the news. But 140 characters rarely gives the full context. Here, the NPR politics team and reporters across the newsroom attempt to do just that for key tweets. 
 

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Chelsea Beck / NPR

Today is the momentous day. The day every four years when this country experiences a peaceful transfer of power from one president to the next.

If you're like most people, traveling to Washington to experience Inauguration Day first-hand isn't an option. So, NPR is providing the next best thing.

Trump Press Conference

Jan 11, 2017
Donald Trump
WRAL.com

The NPR Politics team and reporters across the newsroom will be live-annotating a news conference with President-elect Donald Trump, expected at 11 am on Wednesday. We will be fact-checking and providing background to his remarks in real-time. We will be paying special attention to any comments about conflicts of interest, health care and national security.

Note: This page will update automatically as the event proceeds. We will work to correct the transcript as it comes in, but due to the live nature of the event, there may be some discrepancies.

From NPR

Nov 8, 2016

Today, as results come in across the country, NPR reporters will be updating this breaking news blog in real time. The NPR Politics team, along with Member station reporters, will be providing live updates in the form of photo, video, commentary and analysis for both national and local contested races. 

President Obama won just less than 53 percent of the vote in 2008. Correspondent Alan Greenblatt notes that it looks like Obama will be "just the third president in U.S. history to have been reelected with a smaller share of the vote than when he was first elected. The other two were Franklin D. Roosevelt and Andrew Jackson."

In 1957, Joel Healy witnessed one of the largest nuclear tests ever conducted on U.S. soil.

Healy was in the U.S. Army, stationed in the Nevada desert north of Las Vegas at Camp Desert Rock. He was 17 years old and a private first class at the time.

Healy drove dump trucks, moved materials, and built structures, like houses, that would be destroyed by the explosions so the Army could study the effects of a nuclear blast. He also helped build the towers where many of the bombs were detonated.

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