NPR News

Department of Homeland Security

Wednesday is another big day of testimony before two Congressional committees investigating Russian attempts to influence the 2016 Presidential election. Notably, former Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson (under President Obama) is scheduled to appear Wednesday before the House Intelligence Committee. Members of Congress will quiz Johnson on the details of widespread Russian cyber-attacks that targeted U.S. elections systems last year, and so-called "active measures," a Russian information warfare strategy which includes spreading falsehoods. At the same time, another hearing will be taking place in the Senate, where some current homeland security officials and state election officials will testify on related matters.

United States Capitol building
Architect of the Capitol

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee at 2:30pm ET today, as the investigation continues into Russian attempts to influence the 2016 presidential election. Sessions is expected to take questions about his recusal from the Russia investigation, his own meetings with Russian officials, and what if anything he knew about a private Oval Office meeting between President Trump and fired FBI Director James Comey.

President Donald Trump
WhiteHouse.gov

The United States will withdraw from the international climate agreement known as the Paris accord, President Trump announced on Thursday. He said the U.S. will negotiate either re-entering the Paris agreement or a new deal that would put American workers first. NPR journalists fact-checked and added context to his remarks, including comments about the economy and U.S. energy sector. For more: Here's what is in the accordhere's how the decision could affectthe coal industry, the climate, U.S. global leadership, Trump's public support and the U.S. economy.

Neil Gorsuch
United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit (Boston Herald (direct link)) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

NPR Politics team will live blog the Senate Judiciary Committee's hearings on the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court. The live blog will include streaming video, with posts featuring highlights, context and analysis from NPR reporters and correspondents.

The NPR Two-Way blog will provide live coverage of the House Intelligence Committee’s public hearing on the investigations into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. Presidential election. The live blog will include streaming video of the proceedings, with posts featuring highlights, context and analysis from NPR reporters and correspondents.

President Donald Trump
WhiteHouse.gov

President Trump has signed a revised executive order, once again barring travel to the United States from six majority-Muslim countries and suspending the U.S. refugee program. It's similar to the president's January order that was blocked by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. But this latest order leaves Iraq off the list of barred countries.

Democratic Party Response

Feb 28, 2017

Shortly after the president concludes, Former Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear will deliver the Democratic Response to President Trump’s address. Beshear was chosen by Democratic Party leaders for his record, expanding affordable health care. NPR will have a transcript of Beshear’s remarks and journalists across the NPR newsroom will also be annotating his remarks.

President Trump is the latest in a succession of U.S. presidents pledging unbreakable support for Israel. Last year, for instance, the U.S. signed a $38-billion military aid package with the Israelis even as Washington pressed Israel to make peace with the Palestinians. As a presidential candidate, Donald Trump signaled an intent to bolster Israel in even more demonstrative ways. But lately, in the early days of the Trump administration, the language of support has become somewhat less robust. 

President Trump tweets a lot. With tens of millions of followers on Twitter, Trump proposes policy, shares his latest actions and reacts to the news. But 140 characters rarely gives the full context. Here, the NPR politics team and reporters across the newsroom attempt to do just that for key tweets. 
 

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