Nick de la Canal

Mid-Day Newscaster

WFAE's Nick de la Canal can be heard on public radio airwaves across the Charlotte region, bringing listeners the latest in local and regional news updates. He's been a part of the WFAE newsroom since 2013, when he began as an intern. His reporting helped the station earn an Edward R. Murrow award for breaking news coverage following the Keith Scott shooting and protests in Sept. 2016. He grew up in Charlotte, graduated from Myers Park High, and received his degree in journalism from Emerson College in Boston. He tweets periodically: @nickdelacanal

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Jason Thrasher

The nationally-recognized Southern Foodways Alliance (SFA) is holding its annual summer symposium in Charlotte this weekend. Over the course of the three-day event, participants will dive into an exploration of Latino influences on Southern cuisine. The group is collaborating with a number of local and Latino-run restaurants, primarily in east Charlotte along Central Avenue.

Writer and historian John T. Edge, who also leads the SFA, joined WFAE to talk about the weekend's events and why his organization picked Charlotte out of dozens of other southern cities to host.

The North Carolina man who fired an assault rifle inside a District of Columbia pizzeria has been sentenced to 4 year in prison. Meanwhile, North Carolina Senate Leader Phil Berger says legislators "will quickly override" Gov. Roy Cooper should he chose to veto the Republican-backed budget. And, Duke Energy is moving forward with its request to raise rates by 15 percent for 1.3 million North Carolina customers.

Paul Megget will become Charlotte School of Law's third dean in as many months. Meanwhile, the Mecklenburg County Commission has approved two budget plans, one a $1.7 billion operating budget for FY2018, the other a $1.5 billion long-term capital improvement plan. And, the proposed North Carolina state budget continues to move quickly through the General Assembly.

The plan had been for three Democrats and a Republican to show up to Tuesday night's forum, but that's not what happened.

South Carolina voters are heading to the polls Tuesday to choose a replacement for former Congressman Mick Mulvaney, who now leads the White House Budget Office. Meanwhile, Charlotte's three Democratic mayoral candidates are preparing for a public forum to be held at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, and legislators in the North Carolina General Assembly are preparing to vote on a proposed state budget deal.

Here are Tuesday afternoon's top headlines on WFAE.

Lisa Worf / WFAE

The family of Keith Lamont Scott is appealing a CMPD evaluation that found Officer Brentley Vinson was justified in last September's fatal shooting and will not face internal discipline.

An attorney for the Scott family is asking the Citizens Review Board to review the decision, saying the fatal shooting was not justified and did not conform with CMPD's policies and procedures.

Nick de la Canal / WFAE-FM

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Chief Kerr Putney is wary of a bill that would relax restrictions on carrying concealed handguns in North Carolina. Speaking to reporters at a town hall Saturday, Putney said North Carolinians did not need more laws that could lead to more shootings by irresponsible gun owners.

Nick de la Canal / WFAE-FM

Charlotte Mayor Jennifer Roberts on Saturday held her first town hall since taking office in Dec. 2015, promoting a wide range of city initiatives including youth programs, community policing, and affordable housing.

Nick de la Canal / WFAE-FM

Charlotte Fire Chief Jon Hannan is addressing criticism that his department has for years failed to hire minorities, especially minority women.

African-American and Hispanic women make up only slightly more than 1 percent of his employees. Among the department's 1,039 firefighters, two are African-American women. One is a Hispanic woman.

In an interview with WFAE, Hannan said the problem is not limited to Charlotte.

Nick de la Canal / WFAE-FM

Are you a politically-inclined Charlotte resident with a yearning to take the next step into city politics? Have you been wanting to make a difference in the city, but haven't the stomach or the money to run a full fledged campaign for public office?

Then the city is kindly asking you to consider applying for the newest opening on the Charlotte City Council -- that of District 2 representative.

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