Michael Tomsic

Reporter

Michael Tomsic became a full-time reporter for WFAE in August 2012. Before that, he reported for the station as a freelancer and intern while he finished his senior year at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He’s covered everything from a U.S. presidential visit and a shortage of life-saving cancer drugs to a college football scandal and a cutting-edge art exhibit. Michael has interned with Weekends on All Things Considered in Washington, D.C., where he contributed to the show’s cover stories, produced interviews with Nas and Branford Marsalis, and reported a story about a surge of college graduates joining the military. At UNC, he was the managing editor of the student radio newscast, Carolina Connection. He got his start in public radio as an intern with WHQR in Wilmington, N.C., where he grew up.

Ways To Connect

ncleg.net

Four years after state lawmakers redrew North Carolina's legislative districts, it's still unclear whether those districts are constitutional. The U.S. Supreme Court Monday tossed out the North Carolina Supreme Court's ruling in December that upheld the redistricting. The nation's highest court is ordering the state court to reconsider the case in light of a similar Alabama case it recently decided.

Jeff Kubina / Wikimedia Commons

Four years after state lawmakers redrew North Carolina's legislative maps, it is still unclear whether those maps violate the Voting Rights Act. The U.S. Supreme Court Monday ordered the North Carolina Supreme Court to reconsider the maps. WFAE's Michael Tomsic and Ben Bradford discuss what this means.


National Conference of State Legislatures

Some North Carolina lawmakers want to roll back or repeal a law that regulates the building of new health care facilities. It's called a Certificate of Need law, and North Carolina has used it since the 1970s.

About three dozen states have Certificate of Need laws. They set up a review process through which states can determine when certain areas need new hospitals, surgical centers or even high-tech equipment.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg police have charged four people in relation to a shooting on Johnson C. Smith University's campus over the weekend. The student who was shot was taken to the hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

A Johnson C. Smith University student was shot in the shoulder area around 2:15 a.m. Sunday while sitting in a car on campus. The university's president says the student was not targeted.

CMPD reports another vehicle fled the scene and then crashed. Police say they found three guns and marijuana in the vehicle, and then charged four people with crimes:

Kaiser Health News

Patients rate hospitals in the Carolinas as good but not great. That's according to a Kaiser Health News analysis of the federal government's new star ratings based on patient surveys.

Medicare didn't give a single hospital in North Carolina or South Carolina the lowest rating (one star), and there weren't a lot of five-star hospitals, either.

naturalresources.house.gov

The debate over what offshore drilling would mean for North Carolina played out before a U.S. House subcommittee Wednesday. In the red corner, North Carolina's governor. In the blue corner, a commissioner from a small beach town.


www.carolinashealthcare.org

Carolinas HealthCare System is eliminating its number two executive's job as part of cost-cutting measures. The Charlotte-based system announced Tuesday that Chief Operating Officer Joe Piemont will lose his job at the end of May.

Michael Tomsic

Some hospital systems are using a sort of virtual command center to monitor their sickest patients from dozens or even hundreds of miles away. Virtual intensive care units, also called eICUs, are a way to bring the expertise of a major medical center to remote hospitals in rural areas.

Alan Cleaver/Flickr
Alan Cleaver / Flickr/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

In the Charlotte area, BlueCross BlueShield and Novant Health are setting up a new payment program for knee replacements that they say will save patients money. It's called a bundled payment program, and you could be hearing that phrase a lot more in the future.

Flickr/AndyCarvin

Two parts of North Carolina's sweeping election overhaul are now back on hold. But the change likely doesn't mean much because there are no elections between now and the full trial on the overhaul.

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