Michael Tomsic

Reporter

Michael Tomsic covers health care, voting rights, NASCAR, peach-shaped water towers and everything in between. He drives WFAE's health care coverage through a partnership with NPR and Kaiser Health News. He became a full-time reporter for WFAE in August 2012. Before that, he reported for the station as a freelancer and intern while he finished his senior year at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He interned with Weekends on All Things Considered in Washington, D.C., where he contributed to the show’s cover stories, produced interviews with Nas and Branford Marsalis, and reported a story about a surge of college graduates joining the military. At UNC, he was the managing editor of the student radio newscast, Carolina Connection. He got his start in public radio as an intern with WHQR in Wilmington, N.C., where he grew up.

Ways to Connect

322807Photo by Sean Gardner/NASCAR via Getty Images

Driver Jimmie Johnson cemented his place in NASCAR history Sunday night by winning his seventh championship. But NASCAR's playoffs struggled with TV ratings this year.

Jimmie Johnson sealed off his competitors on the final lap and raced his way into the record books.

WFAE Sarah Delia

Going to a play can be tough for any kid. After all, theaters are normally places where you're supposed to sit still and be quiet.

But for kids on the autism spectrum, the dark lighting and loud noises can make it especially difficult to have a good theatergoing experience - for them and their families. Children's Theatre of Charlotte is trying to change that. It's among several theaters nationwide that have started offering sensory-friendly performances. WFAE's Sarah Delia and Michael Tomsic caught a show recently.

healthcare.gov

Health care in the United States has gone through major changes during the Obama administration. President-elect Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress will soon have the power to flip all that. WFAE's Michael Tomsic reports on what that may mean in North Carolina.  

twitter.com/GarrettVentry

In the North Carolina legislature, Republicans maintained their supermajority in both the House and Senate. That means regardless of who's governor, lawmakers can override him.

vote here sign
Erik (HASH) Hersman / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

A federal judge late Friday ordered North Carolina to reinstate thousands of voter registrations that were canceled within the past three months. The North Carolina NAACP sued over the cancellations in three counties in the eastern half of the state. WFAE's Michael Tomsic has been covering the case and joined Nick de la Canal for analysis.

Google Earth

A federal judge has ordered North Carolina to reinstate roughly 3,500 voter registrations that were canceled within the past three months. The North Carolina chapter of the NAACP sued over the cancellations in three counties in the eastern half of the state.

Google Earth

A federal judge in Winston-Salem Wednesday said the state's process for handling challenges to a voter's registration "sounds like something that was put together in 1901." Judge Loretta Biggs had pointed questions about the cancellation of nearly 7,000 voter registrations in eight counties over the past two years. The North Carolina NAACP is suing North Carolina, and much of the focus is on recent cancellations in Cumberland and Moore counties. WFAE's Michael Tomsic was in the courtroom and joined Mark Rumsey to discuss.

What stood out?

vote here sign
Erik (HASH) Hersman / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

A federal judge in Winston-Salem will hear arguments Wednesday over the recent cancellations of up to 4,500 voter registrations. The North Carolina chapter of the NAACP alleges some of those cancellations targeted African-Americans, and all of them violate federal law. The North Carolina Board of Elections calls that a legal misinterpretation that puts registration policies in most states in jeopardy. Either way, advances in technology have changed the way these cancellations happen.

The North Carolina chapter of the NAACP filed a federal lawsuit Monday over the recent cancellations of up to 4,500 voter registrations. The NAACP says those cancellations in three eastern counties violate federal law. The state Board of Elections disagrees.

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments over which bathroom transgender students must use in schools. The nation's highest court took a case out of Virginia.

This case could settle a question about half the states nationwide are suing the federal government over: which bathroom must transgender students use?

Pages