Michael Tomsic


Michael Tomsic became a full-time reporter for WFAE in August 2012. Before that, he reported for the station as a freelancer and intern while he finished his senior year at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He’s covered everything from a U.S. presidential visit and a shortage of life-saving cancer drugs to a college football scandal and a cutting-edge art exhibit. Michael has interned with Weekends on All Things Considered in Washington, D.C., where he contributed to the show’s cover stories, produced interviews with Nas and Branford Marsalis, and reported a story about a surge of college graduates joining the military. At UNC, he was the managing editor of the student radio newscast, Carolina Connection. He got his start in public radio as an intern with WHQR in Wilmington, N.C., where he grew up.

Ways to Connect

medisave / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/

Researchers in North Carolina and nationwide may have finally answered an important question in health care: for people with high blood pressure, how low should they aim for? Late last week, the National Institutes of Health released results from a landmark study early because it’s already been conclusive.

santheo / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

Early voting begins Thursday for local government elections, and many North Carolina voters may be surprised to hear they can register and vote at the same time. That's because some changes from the state's 2013 election overhaul are on hold as lawsuits play out.

The group behind an upcoming religious revival in Charlotte is apologizing for how it used Governor Pat McCrory in a full-page advertisement. The group, called The Response, says it wrongly gave the impression that McCrory was leading the call for prayer.

The ad in the Charlotte Observer reads, "Our nation is in crisis." It lists violence, abortion, racism, and asks, "What can we do to take our nation back?"

The ad includes a smiling photo of Governor Pat McCrory and right next to his image, "Come join me." 

Michael Tomsic

The federal government is trying to make it easier for consumers to figure out who's good and who's not in a lesser-known part of the health care industry. For the first time, Medicare has released star ratings for home health agencies. The agencies consist of nurses, therapists and social workers who bring treatment to you. WFAE's Michael Tomsic reports on how agencies earn their stars – and potentially set themselves up for higher reimbursements in the future.

Giant Sloth / Flickr

The North Carolina Supreme Court on Monday will once again hear arguments over the state's 2011 redistricting plan. The court had already approved the way state lawmakers redrew the voting districts. But the U.S. Supreme Court is ordering North Carolina to take another look.

As North Carolina lawmakers debate how to overhaul the state's Medicaid program, there's now a new report on how well a major part of the current program is working. The state auditor released a report Thursday on Community Care of North Carolina, which coordinates services for about 80 percent of the state's Medicaid recipients.

One of the Charlotte area's largest companies, Lowe's, is growing its profits but not as much as analysts want.

The home improvement giant reported a profit of more than $1.1 billion for its most recent fiscal quarter. That's an 8 percent increase over the same period (May through July) a year ago.

Lowe's CEO called the results "solid," and highlighted particularly strong growth in appliances and outdoor power equipment.

Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

The fate of CMPD officer Randall Kerrick is now in the hands of 12 jurors. The prosecution and defense gave their closing arguments Tuesday on whether Kerrick is guilty of voluntary manslaughter. Two years ago, the white police officer fatally shot Jonathan Ferrell, an unarmed African-American who had wrecked his car and banged on a stranger’s door in the middle of the night. WFAE's Michael Tomsic was at the courthouse and joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry to discuss.

Todd Sumlin / Charlotte Observer

The trial of CMPD officer Randall Kerrick wrapped up Tuesday after more than two weeks of testimony. The prosecution and defense spent about 2-and-a-half hours Tuesday morning making their final case to jurors about whether or not Kerrick is guilty of voluntary manslaughter for the shooting of an unarmed, black man, Jonathan Ferrell, two years ago. The jury started its deliberations at 2:40 p.m. and adjourned  for the day at about 5 p.m. Deliberations resume Wednesday at 9:30 a.m.

In this segment, WFAE's Gwendolyn Glenn and Michael Tomsic break down the final arguments made by both sides.

Charlotte Observer

Charlotte police officer Randall Kerrick concluded two days of intense testimony Friday in his voluntary manslaughter trial. Two years ago, the white police officer fatally shot Jonathan Ferrell, an unarmed African-American who had wrecked his car and banged on a stranger’s door after midnight. The prosecutors spent much of the day casting doubt on Kerrick’s testimony.