Michael Tomsic

Reporter

Michael Tomsic covers health care, voting rights, NASCAR, peach-shaped water towers and everything in between. He drives WFAE's health care coverage through a partnership with NPR and Kaiser Health News. He became a full-time reporter for WFAE in August 2012. Before that, he reported for the station as a freelancer and intern while he finished his senior year at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He interned with Weekends on All Things Considered in Washington, D.C., where he contributed to the show’s cover stories, produced interviews with Nas and Branford Marsalis, and reported a story about a surge of college graduates joining the military. At UNC, he was the managing editor of the student radio newscast, Carolina Connection. He got his start in public radio as an intern with WHQR in Wilmington, N.C., where he grew up.

Ways to Connect

VA.gov

The independent watchdog within the Department of Veterans Affairs reports the Salisbury VA manipulated wait times and amassed a huge backlog of radiology exams.

Michael Tomsic

In Charlotte on Tuesday, First Lady Michelle Obama emphasized how competitive North Carolina has been in the last two presidential elections. She used that message to rally supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

Courtesy of the FBI Charlotte Office

Almost five years after Erica Parsons was last seen, detectives have found her body in South Carolina. The bizarre story of the Rowan County teenager's disappearance gained national attention.

www.liberty.edu

The Charlotte police officer who fatally shot Keith Lamont Scott last week has a short personal history with CMPD but a long family one. WFAE's Michael Tomsic has been researching officer Brentley Vinson, who, like Scott, is African-American. He joined Mark Rumsey to discuss what we know.

The shattered windows of an Uptown store.
Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

Some uptown businesses are cleaning up Thursday afternoon. That’s after rioters smashed windows and threw trash cans during the second night of anger over the fatal police shooting of an African-American man.

Protests in Charlotte Sept. 21, 2016
David Boraks / WFAE

There was another side to Wednesday night. Although the clashes uptown were eye-catching, the overwhelming majority of protesters were not violent. We're going to hear a conversation with a few of them. Bria O'Neal, Khiana Ralph and Leah Wright are young African-American women who live in Charlotte and came to the protests together. WFAE's Michael Tomsic asked them why. 

Michael Tomsic

Supporters of LGBT protections in Charlotte showed their appreciation for something the city council did not do Monday night. They clapped loudly for city leaders who said they wouldn’t walk back their nondiscrimination ordinance as part of a deal with state leaders in Raleigh.

In the health insurance market that affects the most people, premiums are continuing a recent trend of rising modestly. The Kaiser Family Foundation and the Health Research & Educational Trust released their annual report on the employer market Wednesday.

vote here sign
Jennifer Lang

African-American turnout, partisan politics and the threat of more lawsuits were all on the minds of North Carolina Board of Elections members yesterday. They set the final early voting plans for 33 counties that couldn’t reach their own agreement, including Mecklenburg.

In the swing state of North Carolina, a fight for early voting rights that seemed to end with a strongly worded federal court ruling last month, may be just getting started.

That fight began in 2013, when the state made cuts to early voting, created a photo ID requirement and eliminated same-day registration, out-of-precinct voting, and pre-registration of high school students.

More than half of all voters there use early voting, and African-Americans do so at higher rates than whites. African-Americans also tend to overwhelmingly vote for Democrats.

Pages