Michael Tomsic

Reporter

Michael Tomsic covers health care, voting rights, NASCAR, peach-shaped water towers and everything in between. He drives WFAE's health care coverage through a partnership with NPR and Kaiser Health News. He became a full-time reporter for WFAE in August 2012. Before that, he reported for the station as a freelancer and intern while he finished his senior year at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He interned with Weekends on All Things Considered in Washington, D.C., where he contributed to the show’s cover stories, produced interviews with Nas and Branford Marsalis, and reported a story about a surge of college graduates joining the military. At UNC, he was the managing editor of the student radio newscast, Carolina Connection. He got his start in public radio as an intern with WHQR in Wilmington, N.C., where he grew up.

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Michael Tomsic

A high school student from eastern North Carolina has helped the state's first licensed female doctor receive more recognition in Charlotte. The North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources unveiled a historical marker in uptown Tuesday celebrating Dr. Annie Alexander, who started treating patients in the late 1800s.

Michael Tomsic

Charlotte City Council voted unanimously Monday to repeal LGBT protections the city adopted in February. Council members say they've come around to a deal Republican state leaders have been offering to get rid of House Bill 2, which invalidated Charlotte's protections anyway.

Update on Dec. 19

Republican Gov. Pat McCrory signed Senate Bill 4 into law. He said in a press release, “This legislation lays important groundwork to ensure a fair and ethical election process in North Carolina." It passed the state House and Senate along party lines. 

Original post on Dec. 15

Michael Tomsic

With Donald Trump's election, Republicans in Congress will soon be able to deliver on their promise to repeal and replace Obamacare. That's created some big questions for North Carolinians who already renewed their coverage or were planning to sign up.

One of the places people are going to try to figure all this out is the Mecklenburg County Health Department. Mark Van Arnam of Enroll America welcomed people recently as they walked in.

"Do you have a healthcare.gov account now?" Van Arnam asked. "Have you checked out your options in the marketplace before?"

Michael Tomsic

As the U.S. Supreme Court works toward a ruling on how North Carolina redrew its voting districts, a state senator from Mecklenburg County is continuing his call for independent redistricting. Democratic Sen. Jeff Jackson said the current process results in almost no competitive races.

ncleg.net

The U.S. Supreme Court is considering the distinction between race and politics in North Carolina's redistricting process. The nation's highest court heard arguments Monday in a case that struck down two of North Carolina's congressional districts. WFAE's Michael Tomsic joined Mark Rumsey for analysis of the arguments.

Racial gerrymandering in North Carolina will be the focus of arguments today before the U.S. Supreme Court. The short-staffed court is reviewing a lower court ruling that struck down how North Carolina redrew its congressional districts in 2011.

Michael Tomsic

Protesters marched through uptown Wednesday night after the Mecklenburg County district attorney announced no charges in the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. Amid the anger, there was also a conversation between a demonstrator and a police officer who have both become familiar faces at protests.

charmeck.org

Charlotte City Council will vote on big-ticket items Monday for the next phase of the streetcar, also known as the Gold Line. The price tag has lowered substantially after the city rejected initial bids, negotiated and made adjustments.

healthcare.gov

The head of the Obamacare exchanges is encouraging consumers to continue signing up for health insurance even though Republicans are promising to repeal the law. The CEO of healthcare.gov acknowledges he can't guarantee there won't be changes in coverage.

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