Michael Tomsic


Michael Tomsic became a full-time reporter for WFAE in August 2012. Before that, he reported for the station as a freelancer and intern while he finished his senior year at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He’s covered everything from a U.S. presidential visit and a shortage of life-saving cancer drugs to a college football scandal and a cutting-edge art exhibit. Michael has interned with Weekends on All Things Considered in Washington, D.C., where he contributed to the show’s cover stories, produced interviews with Nas and Branford Marsalis, and reported a story about a surge of college graduates joining the military. At UNC, he was the managing editor of the student radio newscast, Carolina Connection. He got his start in public radio as an intern with WHQR in Wilmington, N.C., where he grew up.

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A Charlotte-based hygiene company is admitting to some dirty accounting. The U.S. Attorney's office in Charlotte is charging Swisher Hygiene with accounting fraud, and the company is agreeing to a $2 million penalty.

A doctor in Hickory pleaded guilty Monday to charging Medicare and Medicaid nearly half a million dollars in fraudulent reimbursement claims. It's the latest example of how the U.S. Attorney's office in Charlotte is building a reputation for being especially aggressive in prosecuting health care fraud.

National Hurricane Center

The major hurricane that was projected to hit the North Carolina coast this weekend is now aiming much farther out to sea. The National Weather Service projects Hurricane Joaquin will pose little threat to the Carolinas, but state leaders are still urging caution.

Ben Bradford / WFAE

In North Carolina, what started with a record state fine over one coal ash facility is now ending with a much smaller price tag that'll cover all of Duke Energy's coal ash facilities. The state environmental department announced Tuesday it's settling the lawsuit, in part because of conflicting guidance from the McCrory and Perdue administrations on fines.


In Mecklenburg County, a new report reveals a massive gap between how many people need help paying for housing and how much help is available. Researchers announced Monday there are nearly 32,000 people on the county's waitlist for vouchers that subsidize the cost of private housing. Only about 200 of those vouchers become available each year.

Michael Tomsic

In the Charlotte mayor's race, city councilman David Howard finished a close third in the Democratic primary, missing a runoff by just a few hundred votes. Now, Howard is endorsing the second-place finisher, current Mayor Dan Clodfelter.


Reporters Michael Tomsic and Duncan McFadyen join News Director Greg Collard on this episode of WFAE Talks.


Medicaid is always one of the biggest expenditures for states, and North Carolina is overhauling its program to try to make its budget more predictable. The overhaul is essentially a mixture of health care models that are gaining national prominence. The result will change who's in charge of keeping low-income patients healthy and how North Carolina pays for it.

Public Domain

North Carolina lawmakers Tuesday passed fundamental changes to the state's Medicaid program. If Governor Pat McCrory signs it, it would change who's in charge of keeping patients healthy and how the state pays for it.

Jayron32 of English Wikipedia

After two years of debating how to change North Carolina's most expensive health care program, state lawmakers will vote on a Medicaid overhaul Tuesday. The model negotiators settled on is a mix of two previous proposals.