Marshall Terry

Morning Edition Host

Marshall came to WFAE after graduating from Appalachian State University, where he worked at the campus radio station and earned a degree in communication. Outside of radio, he loves listening to music and going to see bands - preferably in small, dingy clubs.

Ways to Connect

Immediately following the fatal shooting of Jonathan Ferrell by then-CMPD officer Randall Kerrick in September of 2013, there were differing opinions among law enforcement about whether or not Kerrick should have been charged with voluntary manslaughter.

That’s according to a review of newly released court documents and interviews by the Charlotte Observer.

Fred Clasen-Kelly is the reporter who wrote the story. He spoke to WFAE’s Marshall Terry for Thursday's Morning Edition.

Greg Collard / WFAE

In North Carolina, the state Labor Department steps in when an employer does not pay money that’s owed to an employee.  At least, the department is supposed to. The Raleigh News & Observer this week has a series looking at instances where the department and its commissioner, Cherie Berry, are not fulfilling their duties to workers who’ve been cheated.  Mandy Locke is the reporter in the series that’s called “The Reluctant Regulator.” Locke joined Morning Edition host Marshall Terry for a conversation.

Marshall Terry / WFAE News

If you’re a music fan, chances are you’ve seen the work of Charlotte photographer Daniel Coston.  His
photos have been published in Rolling Stone, Time – you name it.

Comedian Steven Wright’s style of delivering one-liners in a serious, deadpan demeanor is a genre unto itself. Wright’s career has spanned more than 30 years. He brings his standup act to Charlotte’s McGlohon Theater on Friday. Morning Edition host Marshall Terry caught up with him over the phone from his home in Rhode Island. Wright says his reputation for quick one-liners has grown in the last decade, thanks to the Internet. But not all of it’s deserved.

North Carolina's budget deal is heading to Governor Pat McCrory's desk, and McCrory says he'll sign it. WFAE's Michael Tomsic joined Marshall Terry to go over some of the details.

Marshall Terry / WFAE News

David Jones has been the director of the North Carolina Zoo since 1994, more than half of the zoo’s existence. Since that time, it’s gone from being a relatively unknown regional zoo to having international recognition, especially in conservation.  Jones, who is 71, is retiring this fall. We caught up with him in front of the polar bear exhibit, which he says illustrates how the zoo has kept current in the thinking on properly displaying animals.

Charlotte Observer

Now that the Randall Kerrick case is in the hands of the jury, all prosecutors and defense attorneys can do is wait to see if jurors decide if he’s guilty of voluntary manslaughter in shooting Jonathan Ferrell 10 times. Scott Broyles knows what waiting for jurors is like. He’s a former federal prosecutor who now teaches criminal law at the Charlotte School of Law. He joined Marshall Terry to discuss the case. 

Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

The fate of CMPD officer Randall Kerrick is now in the hands of 12 jurors. The prosecution and defense gave their closing arguments Tuesday on whether Kerrick is guilty of voluntary manslaughter. Two years ago, the white police officer fatally shot Jonathan Ferrell, an unarmed African-American who had wrecked his car and banged on a stranger’s door in the middle of the night. WFAE's Michael Tomsic was at the courthouse and joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry to discuss.

Seth Olenick

We’re going to go out on a limb and say you probably don’t recognize the name Brian Huskey. But you probably have seen him. He’s been in several movies and TV shows. Huskey's credits include Parks and Recreation, The Goldbergs, and House. He’s also well-known for a series of commercials for Sonic Drive-In.

Charlotte Observer

We reached out to Scott Broyles to provide legal analysis of Randall Kerrick trial. Broyles is a former federal prosecutor in Charlotte who now teaches criminal law at the Charlotte School of Law. He says he wasn't surprised at Kerrick's decision to testify.

"You can say all you want about a 5th Amendment right not to have to testify. The jury still takes it very seriously and looks very suspiciously at someone who decides not to testify and give their own account," Broyles says.

Pages