Marshall Terry

Morning Edition Host

Marshall came to WFAE after graduating from Appalachian State University, where he worked at the campus radio station and earned a degree in communication. Outside of radio, he loves listening to music and going to see bands - preferably in small, dingy clubs.

Ways to Connect

This week we talk about the debate between the two North Carolina U.S. Senate candidates, incumbent Republican Richard Burr and Democratic challenger Deborah Ross. It was their only scheduled debate.  WFAE's political analyst Michael Bitzer joins WFAE's Marshall Terry.

Celeste Smith / Charlotte Observer

Winning the lottery is just sheer luck, right? Maybe not.  A Charlotte Observer investigation has found many cases in North Carolina where people won so often that it seems something else is at work. For example, a woman in High Point won nine times in four months, collecting $21,000.  Observer reporters Gavin Off and Adam Bell dug into some of these lucky streaks and their costs in a series called "Against All Odds."  The two spoke with WFAE's Marshall Terry about what they found.  

Screen shot / WRAL

For an hour last night Republican Governor Pat McCrory and Democratic Attorney General Roy Cooper attacked each other’s policies, priorities, and political records. The two men vying to be governor met for a debate just four weeks before Election Day. WFAE’s Tom Bullock joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry now for a recap.

Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools

Charlotte-Mecklenburg school board members last night had positive reviews for a plan to diversify magnet schools based on socioeconomic status. Under that plan, the lottery system would be overhauled to encourage a balanced mix of students from different socioeconomic backgrounds. Many entry requirements would be dropped and transportation zones would be enlarged in order to draw from a more diverse pool of students. 

We've got the first televised gubernatorial debate coming up on Tuesday. NBC's Chuck Todd is moderating, pointing to the national attention this race is getting. This week we look at what's been going on in the gubernatorial race and what to expect going into the debate.

Body camera footage from a CMPD officer.

The family of Keith Lamont Scott, the black man who was fatally shot by a CMPD officer a little over 2 weeks ago, has reviewed the remaining dash and body camera footage of the incident. Calling for more transparency, the family asked that footage be made public, and it was last night. WFAE’s Sarah Delia discusses what we’ve learned by viewing this additional material. 

Diedra Laird / Charlotte Observer

Sunday's visit to Charlotte by Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton was a bit different. There weren’t any big announcements promoting her visit, encouraging people to come out for a big rally. Instead, she made some unannounced stops, starting with Little Rock AME Zion Church.

NPR political reporter Asma Khalid joined WFAE's Marshall Terry on Monday's  Morning Edition to discuss Clinton's visit.

The big story in Charlotte has been the shooting of Keith Scott and the protests that followed. And also the release of police body and dash cam video of the shooting, and the new law taking effect that requires a court order to release such video. We talk with our political analyst, Michael Bitzer, about that and more in this week's discussion.

Protests in Charlotte Sept. 21, 2016
David Boraks / WFAE

There was another side to Wednesday night. Although the clashes uptown were eye-catching, the overwhelming majority of protesters were not violent. We're going to hear a conversation with a few of them. Bria O'Neal, Khiana Ralph and Leah Wright are young African-American women who live in Charlotte and came to the protests together. WFAE's Michael Tomsic asked them why. 

Courtesy of Lawana Mayfield

Charlotte City Council did not bite Monday night on state legislative leaders' offer over House Bill 2. State lawmakers said  if council rescinded protections for LGBT people passed early this year, the General Assembly would repeal the bill.  

"It wasn't an offer it was a demand and bullying," says council member Lawana Mayfield. "We teach our children that bullying is wrong, but yet as adults and as political figures to use bullying sends a very mixed message across the state and across the nation."  

She spoke with WFAE's Marshall Terry Tuesday morning.  

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