Mark Rumsey

Community Engagement Coordinator/All Things Considered Host

Mark Rumsey grew up in Kansas and got his first radio job at age 17 in the town of Abilene, where he announced easy-listening music played from vinyl record albums.   

Later stops in his radio career found him reporting and anchoring local news at stations in Chattanooga, Tennessee and Charlotte.

Mark joined the world of public radio in 1997 as News Director at WFAE.  Today, he continues to serve as local host for All Things Considered and produces WFAE’s Public Conversations, an ongoing series of community forums.  

If Mark turns up missing on a nice autumn day, you might find him on the hiking trails at North Carolina’s Stone Mountain State Park.   If he disappears for a week or two – check  the Tel Aviv airport.  Perhaps he’s found a way to again pursue his passion for traveling to the Holy Land.

Ways to Connect

MARK RUMSEY / WFAE

A dusting of snow fell across the Charlotte region early Sunday, then quickly began to melt as the sun came out by midday.  

At Charlotte-Douglas Airport, some incoming flights were delayed due to the inclement weather. A "ground stop" issued by the FAA for Charlotte-bound flights Sunday morning was lifted shortly before 12:30 p.m. However, the FAA advised passengers to continue checking with their airlines about possible flight delays.

The National Weather Service posted a Freeze Warning for the Charlotte area, NC foothills and much of Upstate South Carolina from 10:00 p.m. Sunday until 10:00 a.m. Monday.  

There won't be a legal resolution to the debate on transgender students and school bathrooms anytime soon. The U.S. Supreme Court handed the case involving a transgender teen in Virginia back to the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals Monday.

It's been almost two years since the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department began equipping officers with body-worn cameras. Monday night, Charlotte City Council members could vote to more than double the number of body cams available for use by CMPD.

Organ donor parent Anita Erwin (left) and kidney transplant recipient Candice Grant.
Debbie Gibbs

Candice Grant, of Charlotte, is a transplant recipient.  She received a kidney in 2011, four days after Thanksgiving. Anita Erwin, of Kannapolis, is a donor parent. Her son Michael was killed in a car accident in 2004, four days before his 18th birthday.

More than 118,500 people are currently on the official waiting list for an organ transplant in the U.S., according to the United Network for Organ Sharing. A symposium held in Charlotte on Tuesday addressed possible solutions to the shortage of donated organs. 

Former North Carolina governor Pat McCrory has been out of office since the first of the year.  But he's not entirely out of the spotlight on some hot-button issues in the state, and the nation. 

It's been more than six years since the death of a Charlotte teenager, who stowed away in the wheel well of an airliner bound for Boston. Legislation prompted by that incident has now been approved by the U.S. House.  

Congressional representatives from the Carolinas are mixed on President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration. Trump has temporarily banned citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S. – as well as refugees from any country – while his administration reviews how they're vetted. WFAE's Michael Tomsic and Mark Rumsey discussed how the four senators and 20 representatives from North Carolina and South Carolina are responding.

Advocates for refugees in North Carolina are expressing strong disapproval of  President Trump's executive order that temporarily bars many immigrants from entering the U.S.   "I find it to be an exceptionally unfortunate decision," said Marsha Hirsch, executive director of Carolina Refugee Resettlement Agency in Charlotte. 

Hirsch added that the resettlement program has been in use for decades, with bipartisan support.  She says the program was intended to "remove people from peril" and give them a chance to rebuild their lives in the U.S.

Charlotte City Council members on Monday night could approve new rules for taxi operators. Proposed revisions to Charlotte's Passenger Vehicle for Hire Ordinance were prompted by the rise of ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft.

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