Mark Rumsey

Community Engagement Coordinator/All Things Considered Host

Mark Rumsey grew up in Kansas and got his first radio job at age 17 in the town of Abilene, where he announced easy-listening music played from vinyl record albums.   

Later stops in his radio career found him reporting and anchoring local news at stations in Chattanooga, Tennessee and Charlotte.

Mark joined the world of public radio in 1997 as News Director at WFAE.  Today, he continues to serve as local host for All Things Considered and produces WFAE’s Public Conversations, an ongoing series of community forums.  

If Mark turns up missing on a nice autumn day, you might find him on the hiking trails at North Carolina’s Stone Mountain State Park.   If he disappears for a week or two – check  the Tel Aviv airport.  Perhaps he’s found a way to again pursue his passion for traveling to the Holy Land.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy: Bank of America

Bank of America shareholders will vote Tuesday on whether chief executive Brian Moynihan should continue to also serve as the company’s chairman.   The issue has been brewing for several years. 

Shareholders voted back in 2009 to separate the CEO and chairman roles.   But in a controversial move last year, the Bank of America board changed the company’s by-laws to allow one person to hold both titles.   

The number of people who choose hospice care in the U.S. has grown steadily in recent years.  But researchers have also noticed that among African-Americans, the use of hospice is disproportionately smaller. Recent federal statistics show that  while 47 percent of white Medicare recipients approaching end of life enrolled in a hospice program, only 35 percent of African-Americans did so. The National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization reports that in 2013, 8.4 percent of U.S. hospice patients were black.  

WFAE has been exploring end-of-life care this year. To continue the conversation, Mark Rumsey spoke with Duke University Geriatric Medicine Specialist and professor, Dr. Kimberly Johnson. She has studied the use of hospice care by  older African-Americans.


The number of CMS students who are taking Advanced Placement courses and exams continues to increase.  

  •  8,492 CMS students enrolled in at last one AP course in 2014-2015 school year
  • AP course enrollment by African-American students rose 12.2 percent; Hispanic enrollment was up 16 percent
  • CMS pass rate on 2015 AP exams was 49.6 percent, compared to national rate of 60.5 percent
Belk

The first Belk store opened in Monroe in 1888. The Belk family and the company played a large role in the development of Charlotte. Tom Hanchett, staff historian at the Levine Museum of the New South, spoke to WFAE All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey about some of that history.

Among Hanchett's comments:

- The  Belk family helped build a non-profit infrastructure in the South, similar to what wealthy industrialists such as the Carnegies did in the Northeast.

One of the Charlotte area's largest companies, Lowe's, is growing its profits but not as much as analysts want.

The home improvement giant reported a profit of more than $1.1 billion for its most recent fiscal quarter. That's an 8 percent increase over the same period (May through July) a year ago.

Lowe's CEO called the results "solid," and highlighted particularly strong growth in appliances and outdoor power equipment.

Todd Sumlin / Charlotte Observer

The trial of CMPD officer Randall Kerrick wrapped up Tuesday after more than two weeks of testimony. The prosecution and defense spent about 2-and-a-half hours Tuesday morning making their final case to jurors about whether or not Kerrick is guilty of voluntary manslaughter for the shooting of an unarmed, black man, Jonathan Ferrell, two years ago. The jury started its deliberations at 2:40 p.m. and adjourned  for the day at about 5 p.m. Deliberations resume Wednesday at 9:30 a.m.

In this segment, WFAE's Gwendolyn Glenn and Michael Tomsic break down the final arguments made by both sides.


loavesandfishes.org

  Since 1975, the non-profit organization Loaves & Fishes has helped put meals on the table for Charlotte-area residents facing a food crisis. The program works with government and non-profit agencies to supply 20 food pantries throughout Mecklenburg County. Last year, Loaves & Fishes served more than 78,000 people.  

Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

Scott Broyles is a former federal prosecutor, serving as an assistant U.S. Attorney for the Western District of North Carolina. These days, he's a law professor at the Charlotte School of Law with an emphasis on criminal and constitutional law. We asked his opinion and observations of Monday's opening arguments in the Randall Kerrick police shooting trial. He spoke to WFAE's All Thing Considered host, Mark Rumsey.

Thomas family

On July 27, 1990, Kim Thomas was murdered inside her home off Wendover Road in south Charlotte. The 32-year-old Thomas was well-known as an activist with the National Organization for Women. Thomas' husband at the time, Ed Friedland, was a kidney doctor in Charlotte.

For the first time since 1991, Charlotte will host an NBA All-Star game in February 2017. City leaders consider it a business and marketing coup, but it almost didn't happen. Charlotte's bid for the game had to overcome repeated setbacks. Erik Spanberg of the Charlotte Business Journal wrote about the city's recruitment effort, including the public and private money that supports the bid. He spoke to WFAE All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey.


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