Mark Rumsey

Community Engagement Coordinator/All Things Considered Host

Mark Rumsey grew up in Kansas and got his first radio job at age 17 in the town of Abilene, where he announced easy-listening music played from vinyl record albums.   

Later stops in his radio career found him reporting and anchoring local news at stations in Chattanooga, Tennessee and Charlotte.

Mark joined the world of public radio in 1997 as News Director at WFAE.  Today, he continues to serve as local host for All Things Considered and produces WFAE’s Public Conversations, an ongoing series of community forums.  

If Mark turns up missing on a nice autumn day, you might find him on the hiking trails at North Carolina’s Stone Mountain State Park.   If he disappears for a week or two – check  the Tel Aviv airport.  Perhaps he’s found a way to again pursue his passion for traveling to the Holy Land.

Ways to Connect

The town of Matthews on Monday named Clark Pennington as the new chief of police. He succeeds Rob Hunter, who retired as chief in October after 30 years with the Matthews Police Department.

Carolina Panthers owner Jerry Richardson is selling the team. Richardson, the team's only owner in its 23 seasons, made the announcement following Sunday's 31-24 win over the Packers - and on the same day that Sports Illustrated reported that at least four ex-employees received “significant monetary settlements,” stemming from inappropriate comments and behavior by Richardson.

Mark Rumsey / WFAE

For the last three years, an advisory panel based at UNC Charlotte has helped guide Duke Energy as the company figures out what to do with coal ash. And, during that time, Duke has also contracted with the university to do scientific research on specific coal ash sites.   

Providing research and advice of this nature requires a degree of collaboration. But, when companies turn to universities for hired expertise, challenges and questions about the relationship can arise. Can such collaboration become too cozy?

To learn more about ransomware, WFAE's Mark Rumsey spoke to Dan Lorhmann. He’s the chief strategist and security officer at Security Mentor, a Michigan company that specializes in cybersecurity. He’s also a former chief security officer for Michigan’s state government.

Mark Rumsey:  First, how often is this kind of thing happening that we're dealing with in Mecklenburg County government right now?

Duke Energy - Carolinas says a “data compromise” could have included about 374,000 of its customers over a nearly 10-year period. The company says the data breach may include customers names, banking information, address, Duke Energy account number and balance.

Mecklenburg County District Attorney's Office/Facebook

Mecklenburg County’s next district attorney, Spencer Merriweather III, will be sworn into office Monday morning. North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper last month appointed Merriweather to finish the term of district attorney Andrew Murray. President Trump appointed Murray to become U.S. Attorney for the Western District of North Carolina. 

Protesters gather outside of CMPD headquarters, chanting, "release the tapes."
David Boraks / WFAE

A police consultant group that studied CMPD’s response to the protests that followed the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott last year will hold its final town hall meeting in Charlotte on Monday evening.

David Boraks - WFAE

For several years, Duke Energy has faced criticisms about its handling of coal ash, including concerns about contamination of groundwater around coal ash storage ponds at power plant sites in the Carolinas. Now, the company is facing scrutiny over the way it engaged with experts hired to study its handling of coal ash ponds. 

Court Documents

A new proposed redistricting map would change only a small number of legislative districts, but could have major implications on North Carolina politics. It was drawn not by lawmakers, but by a court-appointed professor to correct illegal racial gerrymanders and other districts that may violate state law.

All Things Considered Host Mark Rumsey and WFAE's Tom Bullock discuss what all of this may mean.

2017 has been a dangerous year for pedestrians in Charlotte.   24 people had been struck in traffic and killed through the end of October, according to the Charlotte Observer. That compares with about 20 pedestrian deaths in all of last year.