Mark Rumsey

Community Engagement Coordinator/All Things Considered Host

Mark Rumsey grew up in Kansas and got his first radio job at age 17 in the town of Abilene, where he announced easy-listening music played from vinyl record albums.   

Later stops in his radio career found him reporting and anchoring local news at stations in Chattanooga, Tennessee and Charlotte.

Mark joined the world of public radio in 1997 as News Director at WFAE.  Today, he continues to serve as local host for All Things Considered and produces WFAE’s Public Conversations, an ongoing series of community forums.  

If Mark turns up missing on a nice autumn day, you might find him on the hiking trails at North Carolina’s Stone Mountain State Park.   If he disappears for a week or two – check  the Tel Aviv airport.  Perhaps he’s found a way to again pursue his passion for traveling to the Holy Land.

Ways to Connect

hudson.house.gov

As President-elect Donald Trump prepares to take office, gun rights advocates say the climate is right for new measures aimed at ensuring Second Amendment protections for gun owners. Republican North Carolina congressman Richard Hudson this month introduced a bill that would require states to honor concealed carry permits issued in any other state.  About 20 states, including North Carolina, already do that.  Hudson says creating concealed carry "reciprocity" would not lead to an increase in crime.

Ken Thomas / Wikimedia Commons CC0

Charlotte City Council members Monday night could add their support to a vision plan designed to revitalize the area around North Tryon Street in Uptown.  

When it comes to House Bill 2, time can apparently heal some wounds. Three months ago, Charlotte City Council refused an overture from the General Assembly. The deal was that if council repealed the city’s expansion of its non-discrimination ordinance, lawmakers would vote to repeal HB2. Most council members, including LaWana Mayfield, weren't interested.

State Republican leaders are trying to limit the power of Governor-elect Roy Cooper during their surprise special session. One of the justifications from Senate Leader Phil Berger is that Democrats did the same thing when they were in power.

Latin American Coalition

In the days immediately following last month's election, many Latinos in the U.S. reacted strongly to Donald Trump's victory. Some called his election as president "sad" or even "a tragedy," and they expressed fear for themselves or their families in the future. 

Members of Charlotte's Latin American community have also been digesting Trump's win and wondering what the future holds under the next presidential administration. "I think there's a lot of uncertainty and a lot of fear in our community," says Jose Hernandez-Paris, who is executive director of Charlotte's Latin American Coalition. He says immigration issues are the top concern for Latinos as Trump prepares to take office.

Facebook

By now, you've probably heard at least pieces of a bizarre tale that's been dubbed "PizzaGate."  The story was fueled by conspiracy theorists on social media and fake news sites, and  involved false claims of a child sex ring that was supposedly operating in tunnels beneath a Washington, DC., restaurant called Comet Ping Pong. The pre-election conspiracy stories alleged that Hillary Clinton was behind the supposed sex ring. 

The Supreme Court ruled the 12th (orange) and 1st (yellow) districts were illegal because race played too large a role in their creation.
ncleg.net

The U.S. Supreme Court is considering the distinction between race and politics in North Carolina's redistricting process. The nation's highest court heard arguments Monday in a case that struck down two of North Carolina's congressional districts. WFAE's Michael Tomsic joined Mark Rumsey for analysis of the arguments.

CMPD officer Vinson (bottom left) speaks to police officers about the shooting of Keith Scott.
CMPD video

 

CMPD officer Brentley Vinson will not be charged in the shooting death of Keith Scott.

"After a thorough review and given the totality of the circumstances and credible evidence, it is my opinion that officer Vinson acted lawfully," Mecklenburg County District Attorney Andrew Murrays said during a press conference Tuesday morning.

Todd Sumlin / Charlotte Observer

A federal judge on Monday approved Dylann Roof’s request to represent himself in his hate crimes trial in Charleston.  Roof is charged in the June, 2015 killings of 9 worshippers at Emanuel AME Church.  

U.S. District Judge Richard Gergel reluctantly granted Roof's request to represent himself in the death penalty case, calling it "unwise." Roof's court-appointed lawyers can still assist in his defense. 

North Carolina election officials are still trying to resolve questions about votes cast in Durham County in this month's election.  And, Gov. Pat McCrory's campaign this weekend gave the first hint that an end to its protest of election results could be in sight.  

Pages