Mark Rumsey

Community Engagement Coordinator/All Things Considered Host

Mark Rumsey grew up in Kansas and got his first radio job at age 17 in the town of Abilene, where he announced easy-listening music played from vinyl record albums.   

Later stops in his radio career found him reporting and anchoring local news at stations in Chattanooga, Tennessee and Charlotte.

Mark joined the world of public radio in 1997 as News Director at WFAE.  Today, he continues to serve as local host for All Things Considered and produces WFAE’s Public Conversations, an ongoing series of community forums.  

If Mark turns up missing on a nice autumn day, you might find him on the hiking trails at North Carolina’s Stone Mountain State Park.   If he disappears for a week or two – check  the Tel Aviv airport.  Perhaps he’s found a way to again pursue his passion for traveling to the Holy Land.

Ways to Connect

Foxx Recaps DNC2012

Sep 7, 2012

The delegates and celebrities, street vendors and protesters have vanished from the streets of Uptown Charlotte.    But city leaders are basking in the after-glow of the  Democratic National Convention.   A tired but happy Charlotte Mayor Anthony Foxx sat down in his office with WFAE’s Mark Rumsey to recap the DNC and its impact on the city.

Dancing Deputies

Sep 6, 2012
Tanner Latham

Never mind the big-name politicians, and the Hollywood and media celebrities. 
The “show stoppers” at one Uptown Charlotte intersection during this week’s DNC have been a handful of very energetic sheriff’s deputies…directing traffic.
 


Presidential candidates cannot be everywhere at once, so they have an arsenal of surrogates, people who speak on their behalf and hammer home the campaigns’ message points.   For the most part, they fall into two camps, political surrogates and celebrity surrogates.   WFAE’s Tanner Latham joins host Mark Rumsey in the studio to talk about the role of surrogates in the campaign.

MR: Tanner, give us a quick rundown of the people who’ve been hitting us up for interviews. 

An academic scandal that has engulfed UNC-Chapel Hill’s athletic department may go back more than a decade.

Until last weekend, we already knew that the school’s Department of African and Afro-American Studies offered several classes and independent study courses that provided little or no instruction. The classes were popular with athletes, particularly football players.

An internal investigation that reached those findings last spring only went back four years, and warned that fraud could go back several years.

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