Mark Rumsey

Community Engagement Coordinator/All Things Considered Host

Mark Rumsey grew up in Kansas and got his first radio job at age 17 in the town of Abilene, where he announced easy-listening music played from vinyl record albums.   

Later stops in his radio career found him reporting and anchoring local news at stations in Chattanooga, Tennessee and Charlotte.

Mark joined the world of public radio in 1997 as News Director at WFAE.  Today, he continues to serve as local host for All Things Considered and produces WFAE’s Public Conversations, an ongoing series of community forums.  

If Mark turns up missing on a nice autumn day, you might find him on the hiking trails at North Carolina’s Stone Mountain State Park.   If he disappears for a week or two – check  the Tel Aviv airport.  Perhaps he’s found a way to again pursue his passion for traveling to the Holy Land.

Ways to Connect

NC.gov

Friday's deadline for counting all votes in this month’s election in North Carolina is being extended. The state Board of Elections says county boards need more time to complete their vote counts. The state board cites several factors including ongoing reviews of absentee and provisional votes, along with election protests filed in some counties. 

The outcome of this year's governor's race in North Carolina remains up-in-the-air as provisional and absentee ballots continue to get counted.  Democrat Roy Cooper is now ahead of Republican incumbent Pat McCrory by just under 5,000 votes. 

But McCrory is suspicious of about 90,000 votes reported late from early voting in Durham County.  While Cooper has declared victory, McCrory has questioned the legitimacy of the vote ever since Election Night.

Wildfires in western North Carolina have burned about 40,000 acres since late October. State officials on Monday said eight major fires continue to burn in several mountain counties. Nearly 1,600 firefighters including some from out-of-state are battling the wildfires. WFAE's Mark Rumsey spoke with N.C. Forest Service spokesman Brian Haines about the ongoing efforts to contain the flames.

Charlotte City Council members Monday evening will consider a proposed redevelopment project near Dilworth - a plan that includes more than $4 million in public funding. 

Some voters may be wondering where their legislative representatives stand today on North Carolina's House Bill Two.  A direct answer may be more elusive than you think.  

www.liberty.edu

The Charlotte police officer who fatally shot Keith Lamont Scott last week has a short personal history with CMPD but a long family one. WFAE's Michael Tomsic has been researching officer Brentley Vinson, who, like Scott, is African-American. He joined Mark Rumsey to discuss what we know.

Courtesy of NCleg.net

Charlotte Mecklenburg Police have released some of the body and dash cam video of the police shooting of Keith Scott. They had the discretion to do that. But come Saturday, that will no longer be their call to make. A new law will require a court order to release that type of video. State Representative Allen McNeill, a Republican from Asheboro, is the primary sponsor of the law.

The bill has been the target of renewed criticism as calls intensified for CMPD to release video of the Scott shooting, but McNeill says critics are misinformed.

Michael Tomsic / WFAE

Updated Friday, 4:30 a.m.
The family of Keith Scott wants the public to see videos of Scott being shot and killed by police Tuesday.  Members of the Scott family viewed dash-cam and body camera videos of the shooting Thursday. 

The family's lawyers issued a statement afterward, saying the videos raise more questions than answers. They say it’s impossible to tell from the videos, "what, if anything," Scott was holding when officer Brentley Vinson shot him in an apartment complex near UNC Charlotte.

http://steinhardt.nyu.edu

The initial outrage over Tuesday's fatal police shooting in Charlotte of Keith Lamont Scott was expressed on a Facebook Live video feed. A woman who identified herself as Scott's daughter recorded a nearly one hour video in which she repeatedly yelled and cursed at officers on the scene.

North Carolina has already lost a series of college sports tournaments because of opposition to House Bill 2. The NCAA and Atlantic Coast Conference announced last week they are pulling 17 events from the state for this academic year.  

Now the fate of another event is uncertain.  Southern Conference officials are considering whether to relocate the basketball tournament scheduled to take place March 2-6, 2017 in Asheville, because of the state's controversial law that limits non-discrimination protection for LGBT people.  

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