Mark Rumsey

Community Engagement Coordinator/All Things Considered Host

Mark Rumsey grew up in Kansas and got his first radio job at age 17 in the town of Abilene, where he announced easy-listening music played from vinyl record albums.   

Later stops in his radio career found him reporting and anchoring local news at stations in Chattanooga, Tennessee and Charlotte.

Mark joined the world of public radio in 1997 as News Director at WFAE.  Today, he continues to serve as local host for All Things Considered and produces WFAE’s Public Conversations, an ongoing series of community forums.  

If Mark turns up missing on a nice autumn day, you might find him on the hiking trails at North Carolina’s Stone Mountain State Park.   If he disappears for a week or two – check  the Tel Aviv airport.  Perhaps he’s found a way to again pursue his passion for traveling to the Holy Land.

Ways to Connect

Police in Charlotte are investigating a fatal shooting that occurred Saturday night on the city's northwest side.  It's the 47th homicide in Charlotte so far this year, compared to 23 killings as this time last year. 

CMPD says officers responded to a 911 call shortly after 10:30 p.m. at the Tropical Bar, Restaurant and Game Room at 4709 Tuckaseegee Road.  Inside the business, police found an adult male who'd been shot. 

Jeff Kubina / Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court this fall will take up a momentous fight over parties manipulating electoral districts to gain partisan advantage.  The cases could affect the balance of power between Democrats and Republicans in North Carolina and other states. 

Facebook / Ralph Norman for Congress, Archie Parnell for Congress

Voters in South Carolina's 5th Congressional District will choose their next representative in a special election on Tuesday. The election was required after President Trump tapped Republican Mick Mulvaney  to become White House Budget Director.

Mark Rumsey - WFAE

Saturday marks the second anniversary of the massacre at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston. Nine church members were shot and killed during a Wednesday night Bible study on June 17, 2015.   

The Charleston shootings prompted national outrage, brought down a Confederate flag, and launched family members of the victims on sudden journeys of grief and recovery.  A year ago, we introduced you to one of those families in Charlotte.  This week, WFAE's Mark Rumsey checked back in with the family of Rev. DePayne Middleton-Doctor. 

Charlotte City Council members are set to vote Monday night on a budget that would keep the city's property tax rate steady, and put more police officers on Charlotte streets.

Juana Tobar Ortega (lower center) with family members.
American Friends Service Committee / Betsy Blake

A church in Greensboro is offering sanctuary to a Guatemalan immigrant who is in the U.S. illegally.
Juana Luz Tobar Ortega took refuge on Saturday inside St. Barnabas Episcopal Church with the blessing of church leaders.  

Ezra Rozenburg
Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law

This week's U.S. Supreme Court ruling on congressional redistricting in North Carolina revolved around the roles of race and politics in the redistricting process.  The Supreme Court justices ruled that North Carolina legislators relied too heavily on race when drawing the state's 1st and 12th district boundaries in 2011.

Duke University

The U.S. Supreme Court Monday struck down North Carolina's 1st and 12th congressional district lines drawn by state legislators in 2011.   A three-judge 

A conceptual drawing of what the Gateway Station could look like, from a November study.
Charlotte Area Transit System

Plans to build a new "multi-modal" transit center in Uptown Charlotte could take a step forward at Monday night's City Council meeting.  The Gateway Station project is designed to provide easier connections between the city's various forms of public transit, creating a central hub for passenger trains, CATS and Greyhound buses, the city streetcar, and possible future commuter rail service. 

www.ncwd.uscourts.gov

There was a big gang round up Thursday morning in North Carolina and a handful of other east coast states. Eighty-three people, accused of belonging to the United Blood Nation gang, face federal charges involving murder, racketeering, credit card fraud, and bank fraud.

Most are from the Charlotte region, including Shelby and Gastonia. U.S. Attorney Jill Westmoreland Rose said the crackdown should serve as a warning to others.

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