Lisa Worf

Assistant News Director

Lisa Worf traded the Midwest for Charlotte in 2006 to take a job at WFAE. She worked with public TV in Detroit and taught English in Austria before making her way to radio. Lisa graduated from University of Chicago with a bachelor’s degree in English. She covers several different areas with a focus on education. 

Ways to Connect


President Barack Obama is no longer planning to deliver his nomination speech to a crowd of more than 65,000 at Bank of America Stadium.  Convention organizers say they're moving the president's speech to Time Warner Cable Arena because of the threat of severe weather. 

“We have been monitoring weather forecasts closely and several reports predict thunderstorms in the area, therefore we have decided to move Thursday’s proceedings to Time Warner Cable Arena to ensure the safety and security of our delegates and convention guests,” said DNCC CEO Steve Kerrigan. 

To Drink Or Not To Drink At The DNC Media Party?

Sep 3, 2012
Tanner Latham

The Democratic National Convention means a lot of speeches.  But it also means a lot of partying as lawmakers and delegates celebrate the nomination of their candidate.  Reporters will have a busy week covering the hubbub.  But this weekend the media got an elaborate party of its own put on by Charlotte's host committee.  In an industry that's squeamish about taking gifts, this is one of the exceptions.  Here's how WFAE's Lisa Miller and Michael Tomsic navigated the ethics of the evening.

The DNC will keep many workers away from Uptown.  For those people who can't stay away, parking will be short.  But if you have a monthly parking pass chances are you'll have a space.  

Several parking garages will be closed during the DNC.  Ben Pai wasn't surprised his usual place isn't available.  After all, it's right across the street from Time Warner Arena.  But that's not a problem since his employer Bank of America asked him to work from home.  

Food inspectors in Mecklenburg and neighboring counties have been busy in the weeks leading up to the Democratic National Convention.  Not only have they been checking out restaurants, hotels, and caterers, but they're also keeping tabs on barbecue. 

Food inspectors have long been gearing up for the DNC.  But in the two weeks leading up to the big event, the Food and Drug Administration told county health departments within a 30 mile radius of Charlotte to ramp up their restaurant and hotel inspections. 

Charlotte Area Transit System

In just a few days alcohol ads will debut on Charlotte Area Transit System buses and trains.  Those ads have gone through an additional review to make sure they don't cross the line.  

Alcohol ads are expected to earn the cash-strapped transit system $600,000 annually.  CATS has already signed two six-month contracts to promote alcohol on city buses and trains.  

But the money comes with a challenge.  The last thing CATS wants is an overly racy ad on a bus that winds through every neighborhood in the city.  

The group that represents hundreds of private bus companies wants to prevent the Charlotte Area Transit System from leasing out its buses during the DNC.

Thousands of delegates and media will be hopping on buses to get from their hotels to the main convention area. DNC organizers expect it will take about 250 450 buses to get people around. But they found they don't have enough buses to accommodate wheelchairs.

Charlotte Mecklenburg School teachers headed back to work Thursday to start preparing for students' arrival on August 27.  The district doesn't expect to be scrambling to hire teachers as the school year starts like in past years.  CMS Auxiliary Services Director Kathryn Block says CMS has a lot of hiring out the way and is in good shape at this point.  The district has filled nearly 99 percent of teaching positions. 

"It's not about putting a body in the seat.  It is about the quality of the teachers we're putting in our classrooms," says Block.

Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools has been trying to get its best teachers and principals in the most struggling schools through an initiative called strategic staffing. The schools have made big gains, but they're still far from where the district expected them to be at this point. Several school board members voiced frustration about that at Wednesday night's meeting.

Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools has released student end of year test scores for all of its schools, except two. West Charlotte and Harding high schools didn't have enough students taking the tests to post official scores for those schools. The state requires a school to test 95 percent of students in a course. Last night, school board members asked what happened.

Superintendent Heath Morrison questioned whether leaders at West Charlotte tried hard enough to get students to take them. But at Harding he said it was a different case.

Kids spend a lot of time playing video games. They spend hours fighting zombies, building underground worlds, waging war, and shooting pigs. Video games can be addictive and an escape. They're just the thing that some teachers are trying to bring to the classroom.

Joel Bonasera is a 7th grade math and science teacher at Albemarle Road Middle School. He knew his students played video games, but he didn't realize the full extent until he overheard a sweet, friendly girl in his class.