Lisa Worf

Assistant News Director

Lisa Worf traded the Midwest for Charlotte in 2006 to take a job at WFAE. She worked with public TV in Detroit and taught English in Austria before making her way to radio. Lisa graduated from University of Chicago with a bachelor’s degree in English. She covers several different areas with a focus on education. 

Ways to Connect

Bank of America sign
Jennifer Lang / WFAE

One of the nation's largest gay rights groups plans to turn down $325,000 from Bank of America this year. That's because of the bank's role in brokering a compromise, which the group opposes, to repeal HB2. 

Lisa Worf / WFAE

Next Tuesday the CMS board will hold a hearing on the student assignment plan Superintendent Ann Clark unveiled last week. The board has scheduled a vote on it later this month. Over the next couple weeks, we’ll break down how people are digesting the plan. There’s a range of feelings. In some cases, relief, excitement. In others, anger and concern. There are a lot of questions all around about the challenges ahead. 

The student assignment proposal is drawing lots of comments from CMS parents. Many of them from the city's south side. Eric Davis, who represents that area, says that's because, under the plan, his district would do the heavy-lifting. Pairing two sets of elementary schools in his district has generated the most comments. He said on WFAE's Charlotte Talks Thursday people are worried about their property values falling and sending their children to schools that now struggle.    

Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools

Nearly half of CMS schools would see changes of some kind, under the proposed student assignment plan the superintendent laid out last night. But most aren't big ones. They involve shifting a neighborhood or two to a school that may be closer, less crowded or allow for a slightly more diverse student body. But there are some more substantive changes, too. WFAE's Lisa Worf discusses the plan with Morning Edition host Marshall Terry. 

Charlotte School of Law is now under investigation by the North Carolina Attorney General's Office. NC DOJ spokeswoman Laura Brewer says the office is investigating the school under the state's civil consumer protection laws and is "very concerned about the current situation" there. 

Lisa Worf

Those who hope new CMS school boundaries will go a long way to breaking up concentrations of poverty will likely be disappointed Tuesday night. That's when CMS Superintendent Ann Clark releases her recommendations for how to proceed with the district's student assignment plan.   

Charlotte School of Law

Charlotte School of Law Interim Dean Scott Broyles has resigned after less than a month on the job. Many students and faculty had viewed him as the last hope in saving the for-profit school. Broyles says it became increasingly clear that his role wasn't producing any good effect for the students.

Now that House Bill 2 is no longer on the books, NCAA and ACC leaders are assessing whether the law that replaces it is enough of a change to bring championship games back to North Carolina. NCAA President Mark Emmert said Thursday night the NCAA should know for sure by early next week.  

Lisa Worf / WFAE

A bill that would divide Mecklenburg County into three separate judicial districts has drawn the ire of many judges. 

David T. Foster, III / The Charlotte Observer

Two Project LIFT schools tried something of an experiment a few years ago. They added extra days to the school calendar to help students learn, but those will likely be cut next year. 

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