Linda Holmes

Linda Holmes writes and edits NPR's entertainment and pop-culture blog, Monkey See. She has several elaborate theories involving pop culture and monkeys, all of which are available on request.

Holmes began her professional life as an attorney. In time, however, her affection for writing, popular culture and the online universe eclipsed her legal ambitions. She shoved her law degree in the back of the closet, gave its living-room space to DVD sets of The Wire and never looked back.

Holmes was a writer and editor at Television Without Pity, where she recapped several hundred hours of programming — including both High School Musical movies, for which she did not receive hazard pay. Since 2003, she has been a contributor to MSNBC.com, where she has written about books, movies, television and pop-culture miscellany.

Holmes' work has also appeared on Vulture (New York magazine's entertainment blog), in TV Guide and in many, many legal documents.

Owing to the oddities of taping schedules, this week's show was recorded just before the opening of the World Series, so it's only fitting that we're joined by our former producer, music director, and favorite Kansas City Royals fan, Mike Katzif. As of the taping, Mike was on pins and needles waiting to see what would become of the team he and his family have followed since childhood. Spoiler alert: they won.

We've got a big live show this weekend and lots of other stuff brewing, so this week, we're replaying one of our favorite shows of the last year: the show we did with Gene Demby and Tanya Ballard Brown about the Fox show Empire and a discussion of public radio voices. Here's the post from February, recreated with links intact!

[From February 6, 2015]

Pop Culture Happy Hour listeners know that we invite a variety of NPR folks on the show, and further know that two of our very favorites are Audie Cornish and Ari Shapiro, who are both now hosts on All Things Considered. Despite this position of great dignity, they're lots of fun on the podcast, and this week, they invited Stephen and me to their show to bring a little bit of PCHH to the radio.

We're always pleased as punch when Audie Cornish of All Things Considered joins us in historic Studio 44, and this week, she's here for our talk about Bridge Of Spies, the high-class Steven Spielberg drama starring Tom Hanks as an American lawyer who negotiates a complicated Cold-War-era swap of a Russian spy for an American pilot.

We often think of marketing as being about either awareness or persuasion. It seems impossible that Star Wars: The Force Awakens (which opens December 18) needs either one, given its astronomically high profile and the fact that curiosity alone will drive plenty of ticket sales, even for those who will take pleasure in being recreationally disappointed.

This week, we tackle Steve Jobs, the solid new film about the Apple co-founder, directed by Danny Boyle and written by Aaron Sorkin (who also tackled Mark Zuckerberg in The Social Network). Together with Gene Demby of NPR's Code Switch, we talk about the dialogue, the interesting structure, the alternatively devastating and celebratory tone of the film, and the (for us) surprisingly nifty turn from Seth Rogen as Steve Wozniak.

We've talked about the novel The Martian on the show a couple of times before, so we rushed out this week to see the new movie (or in my case, to see the movie one more time after Toronto). We talk with our Space Movie And Ronda Rousey And Road House Correspondent Chris Klimek about Matt Damon, Drew Goddard, Ridley Scott, love of science, race and casting, and lots more.

If we're agreed that there's too much good television, then Hulu increasing its presence in scripted originals might seem like just another drop in an already overflowing bucket. But with its new comedy-drama/dramatic-comedy Casual, the first two episodes of which are now available with a Hulu subscription, it makes a pretty good argument for itself.

The title of Maris Kreizman's Slaughterhouse 90210 is, on the one hand, catchy and funny, and it certainly communicates the book's basic conceit: pictures from the world of pop culture paired with quotes from the world of great literature. Based on Kreizman's Tumblr of the same name, the book does its thing with a wink and a dose of wit in many cases, to be sure.

This week, we had the pleasure of welcoming Petra Mayer of NPR Books to our fourth chair for a chat about the comic Ms. Marvel. We must admit, we were more in agreement than we often are, so if you like arguing, you won't find all that much: we really love this series. We talk about Ms. Marvel herself, a/k/a Kamala Khan, from her exploration of identity to her friends and family, and we get into why the book's lively sense of humor hit such a sweet spot for us.

Pages