Julie Rose

Reporter

Julie Rose is a freelance reporter based in Provo, Utah. Before returning to her native Utah in 2013, Julie spent nearly six years reporting for NPR member station WFAE in Charlotte, NC.  There, she covered everything from political scandal and bank bailouts to homelessness and the arts.  She's a two-time winner of a national Edward R. Murrow Award for radio writing. Prior to WFAE, Julie reported for KCPW in Salt Lake City where she got her start in radio.  Before that, she was a nonprofit fundraiser and a public relations manager in the San Francisco Bay Area.  It took a few career changes, but Julie finally found her calling in public radio reporting because she gets paid to do what she does best – be nosy. She's a graduate of the communications program at Brigham Young University and has been a frequent contributor to NPR programs. 

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Local News
6:03 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Family Of Slain Man Applauds CMPD For Swiftly Charging Officer

Jonathan Ferrell's brother Willie, the family's attorney Christopher Chestnut and Ferrell's mother Georgia held a press conference in Charlotte on Monday morning.
Credit Julie Rose

More details – and consequences – are beginning to emerge from a tragic incident in northeast Mecklenburg County over the weekend. 24-year-old Jonathan Ferrell was shot and killed by CMPD Officer Randall Kerrick, who has now been charged with voluntary manslaughter. All Things Considered Host Mark Rumsey spoke with WFAE's Julie Rose about new developments in the story.

Julie, you were at a press conference with Mr. Ferrell's family this morning. What were you able to learn from them about the incident?

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Local News
12:48 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

CMPD Officer Charged With Manslaughter, Due In Court Tuesday

Officer Randall Kerrick
Credit Mecklenburg County Sheriff's Office

A Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officer charged with voluntary manslaughter is due in court Tuesday.

Officer Randall Kerrick shot and killed an unarmed man over the weekend. His name was Jonathan Ferrell, and he was 24 years old. He wrecked his car in northeast Charlotte early Saturday morning, and then banged on the door of a home nearby around 2 a.m. The woman living there called the police.

When officers arrived, he ran toward them. Officer Kerrick fired several rounds, killing him.

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Local News
4:38 pm
Sun September 15, 2013

Apartments Or Automall? Council Considers North Charlotte Plan Near Light Rail Corridor

The Arden Group is proposing a multi-dealer automall on 40-acres off I-85 near IKEA. The property is currently zoned for apartments.
Credit Julie Rose

 A complex of four or five auto dealerships is being proposed for 40 acres of land near where the new light rail will run through University City.

On Monday night, the Charlotte City Council will hold a public hearing on a proposal to rezone the property, which is currently approved for apartments, not auto sales.  

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Local News
12:04 am
Thu September 12, 2013

After 8 Years, Charlotte School Of Law Has Become NC's Largest. So What's Value Of Degree?

Students in the Charlotte School of Law Civil Rights clinic meet several times a week under the direction of Jason Huber to research and advocate issues.
Julie Rose

Since its founding in 2005, Charlotte School of Law has become a big presence in the city.  Nearly 1,500 students go there, making it the largest law school in the state, by far. And as of this fall, they're swarming around Uptown taking 10 floors of a high rise.

What's lesser known is that Charlotte School of Law is the state's only private, for-profit law school.  And while its students pay about as much in tuition as those at highly-ranked Wake Forest, Charlotte graduates have a much tougher time finding jobs that pay enough to cover the debt.

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Local News
4:53 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

NC DHHS Responds To Critics With Slick Infographic

A new infographic distributed by the NC Department of Health and Human Services touts recent accomplishments.
Credit DHHS

The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services is on the offensive now, hoping to offset mounting criticism with a more positive spin on the department's accomplishments.


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Local News
2:59 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Charlotte Loses Out To Kansas City Streetcar In Federal Grant Competition

Kansas City's 2-mile streetcar project secured $20 million - the largest grant - in the latest round of federal TIGER funds. Charlotte's request for $25 million was rejected, but CATS CEO Carolyn Flowers says the loss is 'not fatal' to the project.
Credit kcstreetcar.org

Charlotte's streetcar project is not dead, but its future is in limbo after the city's initial federal funding application was denied.  Charlotte Area Transit System CEO Carolyn Flowers says there are other grants the streetcar may qualify for, but snagging them could require more investment from the city's taxpayers.


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Local News
9:38 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Private Kennel Or Neighborhood Nuisance? City Seeks Compromise

Project HALO is one of about 100 nonprofit animal rescue groups the city partners with to get pets out of shelters. Neighbors complain of noise, odor and traffic. Rescue groups say they're being unfairly targeted by the city's code enforcers.
Credit projecthalo.net

Complaints from animal rescue operations – and from their neighbors – have prompted the Charlotte city manager to have staff look into the current zoning rules regarding operations known as "private kennels."


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Local News
6:07 am
Mon September 2, 2013

NC Peach Growers Consider Self-Imposed Fee

Johnson Farms' Peach Stand off of Highway 220 in Montgomery County, N.C.
Credit Duncan McFadyen / WFAE

North Carolina's peach industry has been shrinking, but farmers still growing the summer fruit hope a little extra money will turn things around.  Over the next month, they'll be voting on a self-imposed assessment ranging from $100 to $350 a year to help fund peach research and marketing.


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Local News
5:00 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Paying For Film, Part 3: How NC Compares

Thirty productions claimed tax credits last year for filming in North Carolina, including some blockbusters like Iron Man 3 and the Hunger Games. Charlotte has become home to a couple of successful TV shows: Homeland and Banshee. By all accounts, the Hollywood business is booming here. But there's a dark cloud on the horizon – come the end of next year, North Carolina's film incentives program is set to expire. 

That prompted WFAE to take a close look at what filming brings to the state, and what it costs us to get those films here. Our two part series wrapped up Thursday morning and WFAE reporter Julie Rose joined host Mark Rumsey to answer a few questions.

WFAE's Julie Rose speaks with All Things Considered Host Mark Rumsey about how NC's film incentives program compares to other states.

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Local News
9:19 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Paying For Film, Part 2: What We're Spending

All three seasons of Showtime's TV series Homeland have filmed in Charlotte.

One billion dollars.  That's what production companies have spent filming in the state since 2007.   

Now here's another number: $100 million.  That's about how much the state has paid those companies in incentives in that time. 

Good deal, right? Spend $100 million to get one billion?  But there's more to the story.


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