Julie McCarthy

Ivanka Trump was welcomed as American royalty in India this week at a global mashup of innovators and entrepreneurs.

She led the U.S. delegation to the 8th annual Global Entrepreneurship Summit, which wrapped up Thursday in the city of Hyderabad, a vibrant IT hub.

Polished and splendidly attired, Trump packed a cavernous auditorium in the city that's emerging as a center of innovation.

"The greatest treasure is you," Trump declared in her keynote address, "the dreamers, innovators, entrepreneurs who never give up."

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As China's clout in the Asia-Pacific region rises, the United States is wooing India into a closer embrace.

Standing beside Indian External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj during his maiden visit to South Asia as secretary of state this week, Rex Tillerson said the United States "supports India's emergence as a leading power."

India is set to celebrate Diwali this week, but the Indian capital could be in for a different sort of celebration.

Once illuminated with clay lamps, the festival of lights has morphed into a festival of sound and fury.

It's estimated some 50,000 tons of fireworks are exploded during Diwali, which marks the homecoming of the Hindu god Lord Ram from exile. But a public health alarm was sounded in Delhi after Diwali last year, when a toxic haze blanketed the city for days.

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India's Supreme Court has made a ruling that could deter people from marrying off their young children. The court declared yesterday that if a husband has sex with his underage wife, that qualifies as rape. NPR's Julie McCarthy reports.

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Until today, Muslim men in India could instantly end a marriage just by uttering, I divorce you, three times. India's Supreme Court has struck down the practice. From New Delhi, NPR's Julie McCarthy reports on the landmark decision.

On a recent weekday, Vamsi Komarala guides me up to the rooftop of the prestigious Indian Institute of Technology in New Delhi, where he teaches physics. Fields of solar panels adorn the buildings.

I swipe an index finger across one of the panels to see if weeks of monsoon rains have washed it clean. My finger comes back filthy with grit.

Vamsi tells me the panels are washed twice a week, then explains the grime: "That is because in New Delhi, we have a lot of dust."

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