Jim Zarroli

Jim Zarroli is a business reporter for NPR News, based at NPR's New York bureau.

He covers economics and business news including fiscal policy, the Federal Reserve, the job market and taxes

Over the years, he's reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders and Ponzi schemers. He's been heavily involved in the coverage of the European debt crisis and the bank bailouts in the United States.

Prior to moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position he covered the United Nations during the first Gulf War. Zarroli added to NPR's coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings and the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center.

Before joining the NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

Zarroli graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

Pages

Business
5:13 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

SAC Capital To Pay $1.2 Billion Insider Trading Settlement

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 7:42 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

As we mentioned a few minutes ago, the hedge fund company SAC Capital has agreed to plead guilty to criminal charges of insider trading. The agreement with the Justice Department also calls for a huge fine, $1.2 billion. And as NPR's Jim Zarroli reports, the company will also be barred from taking money from outside investors.

Read more
Economy
5:12 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Fed, Citing A Still-Struggling Economy, Will Keep Buying Bonds

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 6:00 pm

Federal Reserve policymakers wrapped up their two-day October meeting Wednesday by announcing that they will maintain the Fed's $85 billion per month bond purchase program. The central bank's statement said that conditions in the labor market have "improved" and inflation is modest. But, in explaining the decision to maintain the stimulus, the statement pointed to a slowing housing market and said that fiscal policy is "restraining economic growth."

Politics
5:37 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Obama Makes Janet Yellen His Official Choice To Head The Fed

Janet Yellen is President Obama's choice to replace Ben Bernanke at the Federal Reserve. The announcement came Wednesday afternoon. If confirmed by the Senate, Yellen will be the first woman to lead the Fed.

Business
5:44 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Treasury Officials Mull Credit Default Solutions

The Treasury Department says it will begin running out of money to pay its bills by Oct. 17, if the partial government shutdown isn't over by then. That prospect worries the financial markets. Treasury debt plays a fundamental role in the global economy, and economists agree that a debt default would have dire consequences. But some Republicans insist that a default doesn't have to happen.

Law
4:37 am
Tue October 8, 2013

Jury Selection To Begin For Trial Of Madoff Employees

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 8:26 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Nearly five years after Bernie Madoff was arrested for fraud, some of his former employees are about to go on trial in New York. The trial is expected to focus on how much the employees knew about Madoff's multibillion dollar Ponzi scheme. Jury selections gets under way today.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

Read more
Economy
5:23 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Shutdown Might Mean No Jobs Report, But Does It Matter?

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 11:38 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Among the casualties of this week's government shutdown is one pretty big economic indicator. The Labor Department confirmed today that it will not release September's unemployment report tomorrow as scheduled. The Bureau of Labor Statistics, which compiles the report, says it doesn't have enough people on hand to crunch the numbers.

NPR's Jim Zarroli looks at the impact of the decision on markets.

Read more
Business
5:59 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Nine Japanese Auto Parts Makers Plead Guilty To Price Fixing

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 7:19 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

Most of the people who work in the auto industry don't work for car companies. Instead, they're involved with making the parts that go into the cars. It's a global network that manufactures everything from seatbelts to radiators. Well, now it's caught up in a widening federal investigation into price fixing.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports the Justice Department said today nine Japanese companies have pleaded guilty to collusion.

Read more
Business
5:16 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

JPMorgan Chase To Pay Huge Fine In London Whale Settlement

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 7:07 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

JPMorgan Chase has agreed to pay a $920 million fine. It comes in response to the bank's handling of the so-called London Whale trading debacle. Last year, J.P. Morgan said that rogue traders in its London office had lost $6 billion in a failed hedging strategy, and then concealed it from executives for weeks.

In addition to the fine, regulators forced the bank to take the unusual step of admitting wrongdoing, as NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

Read more
Politics
4:12 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Summers Pulls His Name From Consideration For Fed Chief

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 7:09 am

Former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers has withdrawn from consideration as the next chairman of the Federal Reserve. He cited a potentially divisive nomination hearing. Summers was widely thought to be President Obama's top choice to replace Ben Bernanke next year.

Business
3:46 am
Thu September 12, 2013

5 Years After Financial Crisis, Are Big Banks Still A Threat?

The headquarters of Lehman Brothers in Times Square in 2008, the year the financial services firm filed for bankruptcy.
Hiroko Masuike Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 11:30 am

It's been five years since Lehman Brothers collapsed and touched off a banking crisis that is still being felt by the global economy. Today, the banking industry is a lot stronger than it was, but some critics say efforts to reform banking regulations have fallen short of their potential.

Read more

Pages