Gwendolyn Glenn

Reporter

Gwendolyn is an award-winning journalist who has covered a broad range of stories on the local and national levels. Her experience includes producing on-air reports for National Public Radio and she worked full-time as a producer for NPR’s All Things Considered news program for five years. She worked for several years as an on-air contract reporter for CNN in Atlanta and worked in print as a reporter for the Baltimore Sun Media Group, The Washington Post and covered Congress and various federal agencies for the Daily Environment Report and Real Estate Finance Today. Glenn has won awards for her reports from the Maryland-DC-Delaware Press Association, SNA and the first-place radio award from the National Association of Black Journalists.

Courtney Mason in her classroom at Piney Grove Elementary.
Lisa Worf / WFAE News

Many teachers across the state are set to get belated Christmas gifts in the form of merit bonuses, pending a vote this week by the state board of education.

General Assembly members approved nearly $14 million last year to reward teachers whose students showed growth in third-grade reading and passed advanced placement and international baccalaureate exams.

NC Wine and Grape Council

North Carolina’s wine industry recently got a PR boost with a federally-designated, AVA wine district. AVA stands for American Viticultural Area and the new wine region is in the Appalachian High Country AVA.  


Julie Rose / WFAE

The for-profit, Charlotte School of Law’s accreditation is in jeopardy. This week, the American Bar Association put the school, the state’s largest law school with about 800 students, on probation over concerns that unqualified students were being admitted and that too many graduates were not passing the bar exam.

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

As college tuition continues to rise, some lawmakers and education advocates are calling on schools to spend more of their tax-exempt endowment funds on scholarships for low-income students. Those with endowments in the billion-dollar level are especially targeted by critics, who accuse school administrators of hoarding the endowment money.

Universtiy of North Carolina at Charlotte campus
Wade Bruton / UNCC

Since the recession, endowments at public and private colleges and universities have bounced back to the tune of more than a half trillion dollars. But that hasn’t stopped increases in tuition at most schools, to the chagrin of some congressional leaders and others who accuse schools of hoarding endowment funds.

Community meeting on magnet school assignment plan
Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

Charlotte Mecklenburg School board approved a student assignment plan for the district’s magnet programs Wednesday night. The process involved about 18 months of discussions, community meetings and hearings.

James Hoyt Wilhelm
Charlotte Observer

The CMS board voted this week to name a park at Cornelius Elementary School after Major League Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher and Mecklenburg County native James Hoyt Wilhelm.

Charlotte Observer

For the first time in 16 years, someone different will occupy the state’s attorney general’s office. Former Democratic state Sen. Josh Stein of Wake County and current Republican state Sen. Buck Newton of Wilson are in a close race to succeed Roy Cooper.

Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE News

CMS board members heard from residents Tuesday night during the first public hearing on the district’s plan to diversify magnet programs next year. The proposal involves measuring the socio-economic status of students and re-designing the lottery to get into these schools to create a balanced mix of students. WFAE’s Gwendolyn Glenn attended the meeting and talks with All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey.

Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE News

City Council members unanimously approved Marcus Jones’ appointment as Charlotte’s city manager. Jones, who held the same position for six years in Norfolk, Va, will be Charlotte’s first African-American city manager.

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