Gwendolyn Glenn

Reporter

Gwendolyn is an award-winning journalist who has covered a broad range of stories on the local and national levels. Her experience includes producing on-air reports for National Public Radio and she worked full-time as a producer for NPR’s All Things Considered news program for five years. She worked for several years as an on-air contract reporter for CNN in Atlanta and worked in print as a reporter for the Baltimore Sun Media Group, The Washington Post and covered Congress and various federal agencies for the Daily Environment Report and Real Estate Finance Today. Glenn has won awards for her reports from the Maryland-DC-Delaware Press Association, SNA and the first-place radio award from the National Association of Black Journalists.

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

It’s been nearly 32 years since 241 U.S. military personnel were killed in a terrorist bomb attack on the Marine Corps barracks at Beirut International Airport. Fifty-eight members of the French military also died that day in a separate explosion.

A U.S. federal court found Iran responsible, and more than $2 billion in Iranian assets have been frozen for years.

It’s been a long court battle for bombing victims and family members to collect any of that money. A resident of Fort Mill whose father died in the Marine barracks explosion recently joined that fight. 

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

    

Going back to college after taking several years off can be difficult. Work demands, raising a family or finances can make it challenging. Many schools have programs to reach out to students who left before completing their degrees. At UNC Charlotte the program is called 49er Finish.

A federal judge ruled that state and national transportation officials violated federal laws in the planning of the proposed controversial Garden Parkway toll road in Gaston and Mecklenburg counties.

Single-gender and expanded arts magnet programs may be offered to Charlotte students in future years. The district’s magnet schools are currently being reviewed with a lot of attention going to the idea of same-sex magnet schools.

WFAE

WFAE reporters Lisa Worf and Gwendolyn Glenn join News Director Greg Collard on this edition of our newsroom podcast.

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

  In the early 1940s, television audiences were entertained by the antics of the cantankerous television and cartoon moonshiner "Snuffy Smith." He was known for hiding his moonshine stills in the woods and making toe-curling white corn whiskey under the cover of night.

These days, no shoot-outs are called for because with the proper permits, moonshining is legal in North Carolina. The distillers are more sophisticated, such as a trio who worked for former North Carolina Congressman Larry Kissell. They opened a new distillery in Concord this year and are turning out moonshine while keeping in touch with their political roots.

Tom Bullock / WFAE News

Monday night Charlotte’s City Council voted down a proposal to expand the city’s nondiscrimination laws to protect LGBT people. The vote was 6 to 5. It’s a major blow to LGBT rights advocates and a victory for those who saw the move as part of a war against religious freedom.

Tom Bullock/WFAE News

Crowds gathered early Monday evening outside the Government Center uptown to rally in favor of or to protest proposed changes to Charlotte’s non-discrimination ordinance. The measure would expand protections to include LGBT people in the city. The council is scheduled to vote on that issue later tonight. WFAE’s Gwendolyn Glenn spoke to Sarah Delia shortly before tonight's council meeting began.

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

The UNC Board of Governors Friday approved hikes in tuition and fees across the UNC system. But the center of controversy at the board’s meeting was its unanimous decision to close three university-based policy centers, most notably UNC Chapel Hill’s Center for Poverty, Work and Opportunity. The vote came after the meeting was moved to a smaller room because of protestors.

From a Vine by Andrew Dunn / Charlotte Observer

The UNC Board of Governors had to temporarily suspend its meeting this morning as protestors interrupted discussions on whether to close an anti-poverty center at UNC Chapel Hill and two other policy centers at North Carolina Central and East Carolina University.

Pages