Greg Collard

News Director

Greg has been with WFAE since 2008, all as news director. He came to WFAE from West Virginia Public Broadcasting. In his eight years there, Greg had roles as a reporter, editor and producer. He was the executive producer of a television newsmagazine and news director for radio and television when he decided to head south for Charlotte.

He thanks Giles Snyder, now a familiar voice at NPR, for hiring him for his first job in public radio after stints at newspapers in West Virginia, Ohio, and Kentucky.

If he’s not working, chances are Greg is fishing or paying attention to sports. He usually has a fishing pole in his car because, well, you never know when or where the fish are biting. He likes to spend his weekends and summer evenings bass fishing the chain of lakes on the Catawba and Yadkin rivers.

Ways to Connect

Screen shot from Carolina Panthers website

Carolina Panthers coach Ron Rivera on Sunday gave the type of lockerroom talk to his team you’d expect after a big win.

Rivera praised the playoff-bound Panthers for playing hard throughout game.

He noted they are in the playoffs, but by no means satisfied with that accomplishment.

He gathered players around him. And then, he had players shout the name of embattled owner Jerry Richardson.

Jeff Cravotta

WFAE's new podcast, SouthBound, debuts Nov. 15. It's about the South, told through conversations with people who grew up and live in the region. Host Tommy Tomlinson will engage in conversations with people who reveal how the South shapes who they are and what they do. In this segment, WFAE News Director Greg Collard introduces listeners to Tommy and his goals for SouthBound.

Houses of worship are known as welcoming places, but the recent mass shooting at a Sutherland Springs, Texas, church is a reminder to many that they also need to protect themselves.

Facebook - Brad Panovich

Updated 5:35 p.m.

While Hurricane Irma’s expected effect on the Charlotte area has weakened, the region will still likely receive winds of 25-35 mph. Tropical storm-force wind gusts of 40 mph are also likely, says WCNC-TV meteorologist Brad Panovich.

Body camera footage was released Monday that shows a CMPD officer shoot and kill a man whom authorities say was pointing a rifle at police. The shooting of 25-year old Iaroslav Mosiiuk occurred on March 8th in north Charlotte.

Monday, June 19, 2017  

In this edition of Charlotte Talks, reporter David Boraks joins host Mike Collins to discuss the Foundation for the Carolinas. David reported on the Foundation's rapid growth and influence. You can listen to that story here.

Then, we'll turn to the special election in South Carolina. Voters choose Tuesday between Republican Ralph Norman and Democrat Archie Parnell. The winner replaces Mick Mulvaney, who resigned to become White House budget director. We'll be joined by political science professors Scott Huffmon of Winthrop University and Susan Roberts of Davidson College.

Two prosecutors are gone from the Catawba County District Attorney’s office following allegations that they derailed criminal investigations into abuse by leaders of a church they attend.

In announcing the shakeup, District Attorney David Learner says he “cannot allow the integrity of the office to be called into question.”

Charlotte School of Law

The Charlotte School of Law has drawn scrutiny in part because of the low percentage of students who have passed the state bar in the last few years. It has consistently had the lowest pass rate in North Carolina, and ranks among the worst in the country.

Legislation that transfers power to the incoming superintendent of Public Instruction is on hold. The North Carolina Board of Education filed a lawsuit Thursday to invalidate that legislation. It was scheduled to become law Sunday, but a Wake County judge will hold a hearing on the lawsuit next Friday before deciding whether the law can take effect.

Before we get too far into the weeds, here’s something you need to know: The superintendent of Public Instruction is not the head of the Department of Public Instruction. The state Board of Education is in charge.

Gov. Pat McCrory's campaign and its supporters have filed a lot of complaints about the election. There are complaints about the counting of absentee ballots, complaints about voting machines, complaints about how election workers did their jobs. And then there are complaints that name specific voters targeted for removal from the voting record. These voters are accused of being convicted felons ineligible to vote, similar to what our own former Mayor Patrick Cannon did a few years ago.  

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