Emily Harris

International Correspondent Emily Harris is based in Jerusalem as part of NPR's Mideast team. Her post covers news related to Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip. She began this role in March of 2013.

Over her career, Harris has served in multiple roles within public media. She first joined NPR in 2000, as a general assignment reporter. A prolific reporter often filing two stories a day, Harris covered major stories including 9/11 and its aftermath, including the impact on the airline industry; and the anthrax attacks. She also covered how policies set in Washington are implemented across the country.

In 2002, Harris worked as a Special Correspondent on NOW with Bill Moyer, focusing on investigative storytelling. In 2003 Harris became NPR's Berlin Correspondent, covering Central and Eastern Europe. In that role, she reported regularly from Iraq, leading her to be a key member of the NPR team awarded a 2005 Peabody Award for coverage of the region.

Harris left NPR in December 2007 to become a host for a live daily program, Think Out Loud, on Oregon Public Broadcasting. Under her leadership Harris's team received three back to back Gracie Awards for Outstanding Talk Show, and a share in OPB's 2009 Peabody Award for the series "Hard Times." Harris's other awards include the RIAS Berlin Commission's first-place radio award in 2007 and second-place in 2006. She was a John S. Knight fellow at Stanford University in 2005-2006.

A seasoned reporter, she was asked to help train young journalist through NPR's "Next Generation" program. She also served as editorial director for Journalism Accelerator, a project to bring journalists together to share ideas and experiences; and was a writer-in-residence teaching radio writing to high school students.

One of the aspects of her work that most intrigues her is why people change their minds and what inspires them to do so.

Outside of work, Harris has drafted a screenplay about the Iraq war and for another project is collecting stories about the most difficult parts of parenting.

She has a B.A. in Russian Studies from Yale University.

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Parallels
7:51 am
Thu March 5, 2015

In Israel, A Vote To Choose A Leader And An Identity

Shoppers walk through a market in downtown Jerusalem last November, shortly before Israel's coalition government collapsed. As Israel prepares for elections on March 17, the diverse population has very different notions of what the country should look like.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 1:58 pm

Israel's March 17 election is two years earlier than it should be, thanks to the collapse of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's coalition government in December. Contributing to the breakup was an impassioned debate over whether a stronger legal emphasis on the country's Jewish character would ultimately make Israel less democratic.

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Middle East
5:16 am
Wed March 4, 2015

How Jewish Should Israel Be? 2 Israelis Voters Have Answers

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 7:52 am

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Parallels
8:18 am
Sun March 1, 2015

In Israel, Jewish Divorce Is Granted Only By Husband's Permission

In Gett, the character Viviane Ansalem wants a divorce but her husband will not give permission. In Israel, if you're Jewish, even if you're not religious, you have to be divorced by Jewish law.
Courtesy Music Box Films

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 3:07 pm

In Israel, religious law governs family matters.

For a Jewish divorce, an Orthodox rabbi oversees a ritual that begins with the husband placing a folded decree, called a get or gett, into the wife's cupped hands. But that paper can be hard to obtain, because the husband can refuse to grant the divorce.

A new Israeli film playing in the U.S. shows how patriarchal Jewish divorce laws can trap even secular women for years.

The film is a drama called Gett: The Trial of Viviane Ansalem. Viviane wants a divorce but needs her husband's permission.

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Middle East
4:56 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

Israeli Candidate Made A Name For Himself By Slashing Cell Phone Rates

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 6:40 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
5:08 am
Mon February 16, 2015

Israel Beefs Up Plans To Help European Jews Move To Israel

Originally published on Mon February 16, 2015 7:57 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Middle East
5:09 am
Thu February 12, 2015

Arab-Israeli Parties Join Forces In Upcoming Israeli Election

Originally published on Thu February 12, 2015 9:09 am

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World
6:00 pm
Wed January 28, 2015

Israeli Soldiers Killed In Renewed Fighting With Hezbollah

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 6:20 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
8:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Netanyahu Speech To Congress Is High-Risk, High-Reward, Analysts Say

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will address a joint session of Congress about Iran on March 3. The White House was not consulted on the invitation.
Oded Balilty AP

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 7:50 pm

The Obama administration's rocky relations with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu got rockier this week, and Israelis are watching the spat nervously.

In the president's state of the union speech Tuesday, he asked Congress to allow more time for nuclear talks with Iran before imposing any new sanctions.

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Parallels
5:21 pm
Fri January 16, 2015

French Immigrants To Israel Bring Part Of Home With Them

An estimated 400 new French Jewish immigrants attended a welcoming ceremony after arriving on a flight from France to Tel Aviv, Israel in July 2014.
Lior Mizrahi Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 11:39 pm

French Jews, often with roots in North Africa, have been immigrating to Israel since that country's founding. The community has changed with the times, and after last week's attacks in Paris, is expected to grow — and change — again.

Samuela Mass left Paris in October last year. The 28-year-old French Jew came to Israel for a better life for him and his future family — and to escape violence.

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Middle East
5:15 am
Tue January 13, 2015

Paris Attack Resonates With Israelis As More French Jews Move To Israel

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 8:01 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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