Duncan McFadyen

Weekend Edition Saturday Host/Reporter

Duncan is a native North Carolinian, born and raised in Wilmington. A lifelong musician, he got his start in broadcasting as a volunteer classical music host at his hometown public radio station, WHQR. He went on to host “Morning Edition” there, and then at WCQS in Asheville.

He enjoys live music, hiking, playing the piano, Scotch whisky, and craft beer.

Duncan is an alumnus of  the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill by way of Duke University .

 

Ways to Connect

Nat Fahy

Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, North Carolina is one of the country’s largest Marine bases. But the man it’s named for, Lieutenant General John Archer Lejeune, pronounced his name "luh-JERN," differently from how most people say it now ---"luh-JUNE".

So there’s been a push to revive the “correct” pronunciation of the name. Camp Lejeune Public Affairs Director Nat Fahy says Gen. Lejeune revived the Marine Corps’ war-fighting doctrine by developing its amphibious mission, which proved instrumental in World War II.

The Marine base named in his honor opened in 1941, and Fahy says the pronunciation was correct for while. From his research, the "luh-JUNE" pronunciation caught on in the Vietnam era.

But now, thanks in part to the education efforts of the Lejeune family and a dedicated group of veterans, Fahy says he’s seeing a change. He spoke to WFAE host Duncan McFadyen.


Three film productions will split North Carolina’s film and entertainment grant money for the first half of 2015. This is the first year for the state’s new, smaller incentives program for movie and TV productions. Lawmakers have set aside $10 million for the first six months of this year.

Duncan McFadyen

A count of chronically homeless people in Charlotte this year turned up 516 people in need of help. For three days in January, a couple hundred volunteers fanned out to search streets, parks, shelters, hospitals, jails and homeless camps. Among the people they found was Al Gorman, living in a tent in Huntersville. Since then, the Urban Ministry Center has helped him find a place to live.

Henry Reges/ CoCoRaHS

There’s a network in the U.S. of thousands of volunteers who put a rain gauge in their yards and report the readings online every day---rain or shine.

This group’s mission is to provide hyper-local weather data to meteorologists, farmers, emergency managers and other government agencies. It’s called CoCoRaHS (pronounced ko-ko-RAZ). The name may sound more appropriate for a chocolatey breakfast cereal, but it stands for the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail, and Snow Network. 

WFAE's Duncan McFadyen spoke to the state director of CoCoRaHS, David Glenn. He's a meteriologist for the National Weather Service in Newport, in the eastern part of North Carolina.


If you live in Union County or Anson County in North Carolina, or Lancaster County in South Carolina, you’ve probably noticed a stronger smell or taste of chlorine in your water. You’re not imagining things; the municipal water system is midway through a month-long flush that customers are definitely noticing.


(c) 2015 Succession H. Matisse / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

 The Bechtler Museum of Modern Art has a new exhibit of art books by Henri Matisse. The French artist created a number of these books in the latter part of his life in the 1930s and 1940s. Bechtler Museum President and CEO John Boyer gave WFAE’s Duncan McFadyen a tour. 


The University of North Carolina

The University of North Carolina System Board of Governors convenes its monthly meeting Thursday at UNC Charlotte. During the two-day meeting, the board will consider a proposal that would close three academic centers.  


Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department

CMPD is investigating Wednesday night’s fatal shooting of a woman by an officer who was also involved in a fatal police shooting in 2012. Police say officer Anthony Holzhauer shot 20-year old Janisha Fonville after she refused repeated orders to drop a knife – and lunged at officers.   Police had responded to a domestic violence call involving Fonville and another woman in Dillehay Court, off North Tryon Street. All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey talks to WFAE's Duncan McFadyen about the investigation.

MR: Duncan, where are police in the investigation?

Duncan McFadyen

Area leaders are one step closer to deciding whether to open an extra lane on I-485 in south Charlotte. There’s an extra lane of pavement on both sides of the newly-widened section of I-485 between I-77 and Rea Road. The state Department of Transportation opened the highway in December, nearly two years ahead of schedule. The plan had been to keep those lanes closed until the next section of widening is complete, at least four years from now. But many people have complained that it’s silly not to use the extra lane until then.

Mark Hames / Charlotte Observer

Interstate 485 in south Charlotte is now one lane wider in both directions. But there’s enough new pavement on the highway to open an additional lane on both sides. The North Carolina Department of Transportation says it’s up to a local board to decide whether to open those lanes sooner than was originally planned.  


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