David Boraks

Environmental Reporter

David Boraks covers Energy and the Environment and other topics for WFAE. He also has worked as a "Charlotte Talks" producer (2015-16) and as weekend host (2007-2016). He's a veteran Charlotte-area journalist who previously published the online community news network that included DavidsonNews.net and CorneliusNews.net (2006-2015).

He also has worked for American Banker (2000-2005), The Charlotte Observer (1993-2000), The China News in Taipei (1991), The Cambridge (Mass.) Chronicle (1989-1991) and The Hartford Courant (1986-89).

David has a bachelor's  degree in history from Cornell University and a master's degree from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn.

In Huntersville, challenger John Aneralla easily unseated four-term Mayor Jill Swain after an unusually

combative election campaign, winning 59 percent of the vote.  Voters there also added three new members to the six-member Town Board, unseating incumbents Sarah McAulay and Jeff Neely.

Tasnim Shamma / WFAE file photo

SUNDAY HEADLINES: State public safety officials say a friend and campaign donor of Gov. Pat McCrory got his company’s prison maintenance contracts extended, even after the public safety department’s leader said the contracts shouldn’t be renewed.

Fieldvale place shooting scene
Todd Sumlin / The Charlotte Observer

It has been a deadly Labor Day weekend so far in Charlotte, with five people killed in four separate shootings amid a wave of gun violence as of Sunday morning. A 7-year-old boy was shot to death and three other people were injured at a home in southwest Charlotte Saturday night.

North Carolina Democrats have a new leader.  At a meeting in Pittsboro Saturday, hundreds of party activists elected Patsy Keever of Asheville as chair. She got a majority of the votes cast among the five seeking to succeed outgoing Chair Randy Voller, who did not seek re-election.  Keever has been first vice chair, the party’s number two in command, since 2013. She’s a former state legislator, county commissioner and two-time congressional candidate.   

Hundreds of marchers, from high school bands to dancers to community leaders, marched through uptown Charlotte in Saturday in the annual Martin Luther King Day Parade.  The parade was part of a weekend full of events for the King Day Holiday.

Sunday headlines: It was a game of big plays Saturday night in Seattle, but they didn’t go the right way for the Carolina Panthers. The Seahawks pulled away in the fourth quarter to win their NFC playoff, 31 to 17.  Russell Wilson threw three touchdown passes to lead the victory, but Seattle’s Kam Chancellor had the night’s biggest play, with 5:55 left in the game. He anticipated Cam Newton’s pass, stepped in front of receiver Ed Dickson, and returned the interception 90 yards for a touchdown.

The Carolina Panthers are headed to the NFC Divisional playoff next weekend thanks to a record-setting defensive performance Saturday at Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte.  The Panthers held Arizona to just 78 yards of offense – an NFL playoff record – in the 27 to 16 victory in the NFC Wild Card playoff game.

More charter schools are in the planning stages in North Carolina. The Charlotte Observer reports the state received 11 more applications for charters next year, including three in the Charlotte area.   The expected growth comes as the latest crop of new schools falls short of enrollment projections. The newspaper reports that two Charlotte area charters have closed over the past two years in their first years,  because of low enrollment and other troubles.

New federal rules are out governing disposal of coal ash, but environmentalists aren’t too happy.  They’ve been calling for stricter controls for years on the ash, which is the byproduct of burning coal for electricity. The government acted after a series of spills: Six years ago, there was a massive spill of coal ash sludge in Tennessee. Three years later, tons of coal ash swept into Lake Michigan. Last February, another spill and gray sludge spewed into North Carolina’s Dan River. Environmentalists wanted coal ash to be treated as hazardous waste.

Protests have continued around the nation and in North Carolina this weekend, aimed at calling attention to police killings of unarmed black men.  In Fayetteville Saturday, marchers waved signs along the curb of Ski-bo Road, chanting "Hands Up, Don't Shoot." Passing motorists honked their horns in support.  Police didn't have an estimate of the number of marchers.  And in downtown Charlotte yesterday afternoon, about 60 people protested at Trade and Tryon streets.

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