David Boraks

Environmental Reporter

David Boraks covers Energy and the Environment and other topics for WFAE. He also has worked as a "Charlotte Talks" producer (2015-16) and as weekend host (2007-2016). He's a veteran Charlotte-area journalist who previously published the online community news network that included DavidsonNews.net and CorneliusNews.net (2006-2015).

He also has worked for American Banker (2000-2005), The Charlotte Observer (1993-2000), The China News in Taipei (1991), The Cambridge (Mass.) Chronicle (1989-1991) and The Hartford Courant (1986-89).

David has a bachelor's  degree in history from Cornell University and a master's degree from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn.

The two major-party U.S. Senate candidates in North Carolina are traveling the state this weekend trying to energize their allies with speeches and visits from out-of-state politicians. The campaigns of Republican Thom Tillis and incumbent Democratic Senator Kay Hagan also are raising a ton of money. With help from wealthy donors and outside groups, more than $100 million now has been spent on the North Carolina Senate race, the Charlotte Observer reports.

The North Carolina state fair is known for its ferris wheels, fried food and racing pigs. Now a group called Grass Roots North Carolina wants it to add concealed handguns, too.  A judge on Monday will hold a hearing on the gun-rights group’s argument that a recent change in state law makes it illegal for the fair to ban concealed-carry permit holders from bringing guns.

The director of a conservative political group is blaming administrative errors for mistakes in voter registration forms the organization mailed in recent weeks.  Donald Bryson is North Carolina's director of Americans for Prosperity Foundation, which mailed the forms. He said in a statement the forms had "minor administrative errors" and old information. 

Bill Gidduz

(June 14, 2012) The bluegrass folk rock band Cast Iron Filter was a favorite on concert circuit in Charlotte and across the Southeast in the late 1990s and early 2000s before its breakup in 2004. Thursday night they'll return to their old Charlotte haunt, the Visulite Theater, as part of weeklong reunion. 

Force of Nature

Oct 12, 2006

A project involving universities and art galleries in North and South Carolina has brought Japanese modern artists here this month to create works about the relationship between humans and nature. As they create their works, many are getting up close with the local environment. David Boraks reports. For detail, photographs and a calendar of events, visit the Force of Nature project website.

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