David Boraks

Environmental Reporter

David Boraks covers Energy and the Environment and other topics for WFAE. He also has worked as a "Charlotte Talks" producer (2015-16) and as weekend host (2007-2016). He's a veteran Charlotte-area journalist who previously published the online community news network that included DavidsonNews.net and CorneliusNews.net (2006-2015).

He also has worked for American Banker (2000-2005), The Charlotte Observer (1993-2000), The China News in Taipei (1991), The Cambridge (Mass.) Chronicle (1989-1991) and The Hartford Courant (1986-89).

David has a bachelor's  degree in history from Cornell University and a master's degree from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn.

David Boraks / WFAE

Duke Energy is the nation’s largest power company, supplying electricity to more than 7 million customers in the Southeast and Midwest. But for the past six years, the Charlotte company also has been quietly building a separate startup business that sells wind and solar power to other utilities and businesses.

I-485 Toll Lane Map
NCDOT

The toll-lane widening project that began construction on I-77 north of Charlotte this week won’t be the only one in the Charlotte area. Next up are toll lanes on 17 miles of I-485 in south Charlotte, from I-77 to US 74.

 

The NCDOT hopes to sign a contract for the $200 million project in July. One toll lane is planned in both directions, as a way to guarantee travel times on the congested stretch. Construction would begin in 2017 and take a couple of years.  

 

http://www.ncdot.gov

Drivers will have to deal with construction for a while in addition to the regular rush-hour backups on I-77 north of Charlotte. Work began Monday night on a 3-year, $648 million project to widen a 26-mile section of the road with toll lanes.

And if you’ve been following the debate on this project, you know it’s very controversial. Even as construction begins, opponents are fighting to halt it. WFAE’s David Boraks joins All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey now.


David Boraks / CorneliusNews.net file photo

Some state lawmakers are stepping up efforts to halt the construction of toll lanes on I-77 north of Charlotte, as construction begins Monday. They called on Governor Pat McCrory Friday to cancel the project, but he wasted little time in rejecting the idea.  

David Boraks / CorneliusNews.net file photo

The company hired to build and operate toll lanes on I-77 north of Charlotte says it will begin construction work on the $648 million project this Monday, Nov. 16.

E2D leaders accept US award
E2D

There's a technology gap in Mecklenburg County for some local students - not at school, but at home. A North Mecklenburg group is trying to close that digital divide. And now it has been recognized as the most innovative in the nation.

A Davidson group called E2D - for Eliminate the Digital Divide - has made big strides over the past three years in closing the gap between technology haves and have-nots in Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools. Founded three years ago, E2D provides free computers to families that lack them, along with training and low-cost internet access.

In Huntersville, challenger John Aneralla easily unseated four-term Mayor Jill Swain after an unusually

combative election campaign, winning 59 percent of the vote.  Voters there also added three new members to the six-member Town Board, unseating incumbents Sarah McAulay and Jeff Neely.

Tasnim Shamma / WFAE file photo

SUNDAY HEADLINES: State public safety officials say a friend and campaign donor of Gov. Pat McCrory got his company’s prison maintenance contracts extended, even after the public safety department’s leader said the contracts shouldn’t be renewed.

Fieldvale place shooting scene
Todd Sumlin / The Charlotte Observer

It has been a deadly Labor Day weekend so far in Charlotte, with five people killed in four separate shootings amid a wave of gun violence as of Sunday morning. A 7-year-old boy was shot to death and three other people were injured at a home in southwest Charlotte Saturday night.

North Carolina Democrats have a new leader.  At a meeting in Pittsboro Saturday, hundreds of party activists elected Patsy Keever of Asheville as chair. She got a majority of the votes cast among the five seeking to succeed outgoing Chair Randy Voller, who did not seek re-election.  Keever has been first vice chair, the party’s number two in command, since 2013. She’s a former state legislator, county commissioner and two-time congressional candidate.   

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