David Boraks

Reporter

David Boraks covers energy & the environment, politics & government, transportation and other topics for WFAE.  He previously worked as a "Charlotte Talks" producer (2015-16) and weekend host (2007-2016). He's a veteran Charlotte-area journalist who previously published the online community news network that included DavidsonNews.net and CorneliusNews.net (2006-2015).

He also has worked for American Banker (2000-2005), The Charlotte Observer (1993-2000), The China News in Taipei (1991), The Cambridge (Mass.) Chronicle (1989-1991) and The Hartford Courant (1986-89).

David has a bachelor's  degree in history from Cornell University and a master's degree from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn.

Charlotte City Council member tried out a scooter recently.
Courtesy of Tariq Bokhari

Electric rental scooters are now legal in Charlotte. Three companies have gotten city permits to begin deploying scooters around uptown beginning Monday - after one started without permission.

Wilmore Elementary School opened in 1925. It's owned by Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools and is proposed for historic status.
CHARLOTTE-MECKLENBURG HISTORIC LANDMARKS COMMISSION

The Charlotte City Council is scheduled to vote Monday night whether to grant historic landmark status to the old Wilmore Elementary School on West Boulevard.  

Map shows the location of the planned Seventh & Tryon redevelopment.
SeventhandTryon.com

Five development teams have been asked to submit proposals to redevelop a two-block area along North Tryon Street in uptown Charlotte.  The planned Seventh & Tryon project would include shops, offices, a hotel, and affordable and market-rate apartments alongside a new or renovated Charlotte-Mecklenburg Main Library.

Marchers on Bicentennial Mall in Raleigh Wednesday headed toward the state legislature.
David Boraks / WFAE

Thousands of educators from across North Carolina gathered Wednesday at the state capitol in Raleigh to join the March for Students and Rally for Respect. Their message about the need for better pay and increased school funding was loud and clear. The response from Republican legislative leaders was a promise of more raises - but also a campaign to correct what they call misinformation about their efforts.

The NCDOT's I-77 Local Advisory Committee met Thursday in Cornelius.
David Boraks / WFAE

The private contractor building toll lanes on I-77 north of Charlotte says revising or ending its contract will cost a lot more than what's been discussed at an NCDOT advisory committee in recent months.  That warning came in letters from I-77 Mobility Partners to the DOT.  

David Boraks/ WFAE

It was a sea of red Wednesday as teachers and school workers flooded the streets of downtown Raleigh, calling for more support and funding of the public school system. 

NCDOT secretary Jim Trogdon listens to local officials' recommendations for revising the I-77 toll lane project Thursday at the Lake Norman Chamber of Commerce in Cornelius.
David Boraks / WFAE

Opponents of North Carolina Department of Transportation's $650 million toll-lane project on I-77 from Charlotte to Lake Norman are lining up behind a possible compromise. It wouldn't completely eliminate tolls, but they hope it would ease the project's impact on the area. 

A 31-year-old Charlotte man has been charged with shooting his girlfriend to death at an apartment in southwest Charlotte early Thursday.

Workers installed beams in late April for a new bridge over I-77 near LaSalle Street near uptown Charlotte.
I-77 Mobility Partners

An advisory group that's helping the North Carolina Department of Transportation review the $650 million toll-lane project on I-77 will meet again Thursday afternoon to offer final recommendations.  Some members want to cancel the deal, but it could come at a steep price. 

Updated Wednesday, May 9, 2018
Former CMPD homicide detective Garry McFadden has won the race to become Mecklenburg County's next sheriff, besting incumbent Irwin Carmichael and fellow challenger Antoine Ensley.  McFadden says he wants to build unity and trust, by reversing some of Carmichael's controversial policies.

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