David Boraks

Environmental Reporter

David Boraks covers Energy and the Environment and other topics for WFAE. He also has worked as a "Charlotte Talks" producer (2015-16) and as weekend host (2007-2016). He's a veteran Charlotte-area journalist who previously published the online community news network that included DavidsonNews.net and CorneliusNews.net (2006-2015).

He also has worked for American Banker (2000-2005), The Charlotte Observer (1993-2000), The China News in Taipei (1991), The Cambridge (Mass.) Chronicle (1989-1991) and The Hartford Courant (1986-89).

David has a bachelor's  degree in history from Cornell University and a master's degree from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn.

Bank of America sign
Jennifer Lang / WFAE

Higher interest rates are helping boost financial results at Bank of America. The bank says profits rose 40 percent in the first three months of the year, compared with a year ago. B of A also saw growth in all its major businesses.

Charlotte is known as a tree city, with lush neighborhoods and even tree-lined downtown streets, like College Street.
David Boraks / WFAE

Charlotte has a goal of having trees cover 50 percent of the city by 2050. But a report out this month says the city may have trouble hitting that goal, as trees disappear faster than they can be planted.

The Police Foundation review team at Wednesday's meeting, from left: chief operating officer Blake Norton, Roberto Villasenor, Frank Straub, and the Rev. Jeffrey Brown.
David Boraks / WFAE

A team of outside reviewers is in Charlotte this week to begin examining procedures and community relations at Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department. The Police Foundation's first public meeting Wednesday night was billed as a "listening session," but there were lots of questions, too.

The 10-year plan includes upgrading power lines and systems across Duke's North Carolina grid.
David Boraks / WFAE

Duke Energy plans to spend an extra $13 billion over the next decade to modernize the power lines and systems that distribute electricity in North Carolina. The upgrades include burying lines, adding technology to reduce outages, and giving customers more energy efficiency tools. 

A 26-year-old man has been charged with stabbing his mother to death in Charlotte Monday. Meanwhile, a wildfire near Pisgah National Forest is threatening homes and affecting air quality in western North Carolina. And at South Carolina state court,  Dylann Roof has been sentenced to nine life terms in the shooting deaths of nine people at a Charleston church in 2015.

Updated 4:25 p.m.
The state Senate on Tuesday passed a bill to reduce the number of state appeals court judges, and gave preliminary final approval to a bill that would relax state regulations on the environment and businesses. Senators also confirmed three more Cabinet picks of Gov. Roy Cooper, for commerce, environment and cultural resources. Other bills making their way through the General Assembly would enact new restrictions on opioids, and limit lawsuits against large hog farms. 

Demonstrators line up by the convention center.
David Boraks / WFAE

The police killing of Keith Scott last September brought several nights of sometimes violent demonstrations uptown. So Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police hired a consultant to examine their operations and community relations. This week, reviewers from The Police Foundation of Washington, DC, make their first visit, with a public meeting Wednesday night. 

The NBA’s commissioner says it’s not a done deal, but Charlotte is again “eligible” to host the NBA all star game after the repeal and replacement of House Bill 2. In other headlines Sunday: Mecklenburg County Democrats picked Jane Whitley as chair at their convention Saturday. Meanwhile, both the Charlotte Knights and Charlotte Checkers had big wins Saturday.

Dr. David Jacobs, a violence prevention specialist at Carolinas HealthCare System, offered crime data at the start of Friday's conference, at Friendship Missionary Baptist Church on Beatties Ford Road.
David Boraks / WFAE

Twenty-seven people have been murdered in Charlotte since the start of the year. That's about double the number a year ago, and mirrors a local and national trend of growth in violent crime. Experts are trying to understand why, and more importantly, what to do about it. WFAE reporter David Boraks was at a conference on Youth Violence Prevention Friday in Charlotte and talked with WFAE’s Lisa Worf.

New signs and pavement markings are planned for the toll lane work zone on I-77 from Charlotte to Mooresville.
David Boraks / WFAE

The North Carolina Department of Transportation plans new signs and other safety improvements on I-77, in the construction zone for toll lanes between Charlotte and Mooresville.

NCDOT announced the changes Friday, after a recent inspection by its top traffic engineers. That review came after recent complaints from drivers about wrecks in the work zone.

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