David Boraks

Environmental Reporter

David Boraks covers Energy and the Environment and other topics for WFAE. He also has worked as a "Charlotte Talks" producer (2015-16) and as weekend host (2007-2016). He's a veteran Charlotte-area journalist who previously published the online community news network that included DavidsonNews.net and CorneliusNews.net (2006-2015).

He also has worked for American Banker (2000-2005), The Charlotte Observer (1993-2000), The China News in Taipei (1991), The Cambridge (Mass.) Chronicle (1989-1991) and The Hartford Courant (1986-89).

David has a bachelor's  degree in history from Cornell University and a master's degree from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn.

The Allen plant in Belmont was one of the places Duke Energy used calcium bromide to help remove mercury from coal.  Bromide later was found in Charlotte's Water supply.
David Boraks / WFAE

Duke Energy has withdrawn a request for state permission to use an additive at its coal-fired power plants that caused problems two years ago with Charlotte's drinking water. Environmental groups had sued, and celebrated the move. Duke said its decision was unrelated to the challenge.

Murders were reported on Sunday in both Charlotte and Hickory. Meanwhile, police are asking for help finding the driver of a white SUV who struck and killed another man on Freedom Drive, then left the scene. And N.C. civil rights leader William Barber and other activists have been banned from the state legislature after his arrest in recent health care protest.

CEO Michael Marsicano spoke at the Foundation for the Carolinas annual meeting in March.
Sean Busher

The Foundation for the Carolinas has become a driving force in the Charlotte region on issues like the environment, education, social services and the arts. It's also helping transform uptown, including a project just begun - the $100 million Carolina Theatre renovation and hotel development on North Tryon Street.

Charlotte's bid for a Major League Soccer franchise has overshadowed the fact that the city already has a professional soccer team - the Charlotte Independence, in the United Soccer League. They'll celebrate a milestone Saturday night, when they move into a new 2,500-seat stadium in Matthews.

David Boraks / WFAE

More drones are flying in North Carolina skies, and that’s leading to more close encounters with aircraft - like two last week over Charlotte. One involved a police helicopter, the other an American Airlines jet. The problem, authorities say, is many operators don’t know the law.

An NCDOT traffic camera showed I-77 northbound at Mile 21 jammed around 2 p.m. on May 12 because of work on the damaged sign near Exit 31.
NCDOT

NCDOT has fined the lead contractor on the I-77 toll lanes project $412,500 for daytime lane closures after construction accident in Mooresville last month that caused a day-long traffic jam. The DOT notified I-77 Mobility Partners of the penalty in a letter Thursday.

Charlotte City Council members discussed the budget before passing it Monday night.
City of Charlotte

The Charlotte City Council voted unanimously Monday night to adopt the city's $2.4 billion budget for 2017-18. The plan increases some fees, but not property taxes; adds police officers and firefighters; and includes raises for city employees. 

The proposed unit would add 400 megawatts of generating capacity at the plant near Denver.
Siemens

Duke Energy is asking state regulators for permission to expand its gas-fired turbine power plant in Lincoln County.  Duke says the project is needed to meet a growing demand for electricity during winter and summer months.  

charlotte soccer stadium
MANICA Architecture/Major League Soccer

Updated Tuesday, June 13, 2017
Mecklenburg County Commissioners on Monday took a step back from their January vote in favor of funding a new Major League Soccer stadium in Charlotte.

The number of homicides in Charlotte this year is now up to 40. That’s after police announced charges against two people in separate cases over the past 24 hours. 

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