Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a blogger and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship blog. In the past, he has coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, and edited the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

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The Two-Way
1:31 pm
Tue June 23, 2015

Solar-Powered Plane's Japan-Hawaii Flight Is Postponed

Pilot Andre Borschberg of Switzerland sits aboard the Solar Impulse as a ground crew pushes the plane at the airport in Nagoya, Japan, prior to taking off for Hawaii.
Toshifumi Kitamura AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 3:07 pm

The Solar Impulse, an aircraft that generates power solely from the sun's energy, is set to embark on the longest leg of its planned round-the-world journey: a trip of some 115 hours between Nagoya, Japan, and Hawaii. But weather concerns have forced another delay.

The Solar Impulse 2 had initially been slated to take off from Japan around 1:30 p.m. ET.

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The Two-Way
12:44 pm
Tue June 23, 2015

NASA Flummoxed By Dwarf Planet's Bright Spots, 'Pyramid-Shaped Peak'

A "cluster of mysterious bright spots" can be seen on the dwarf planet Ceres, NASA says. The image was taken by the Dawn spacecraft, in orbit of Ceres.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 1:01 pm

New images of Ceres are the clearest ever taken, but NASA's scientists still haven't figured out the enigmatic dwarf planet. The agency's latest photos of Ceres show multiple bright spots — and a "pyramid-shaped peak towering over a relatively flat landscape."

That's according to an update posted by the space agency, saying that Ceres and its bright spots "continue to mystify."

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The Two-Way
10:59 am
Tue June 23, 2015

James Horner, A Giant Among Movie Music Composers, Is Dead, Agents Say

Composer James Horner, seen here at a movie premiere in 2012, is believed to have died in a plane crash.
Gareth Cattermole Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 11:38 pm

Update: 11:30 p.m. ET

In a statement Tuesday night, the talent agency that represented Horner mourned "the tragic passing of our dear colleague."

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The Two-Way
3:50 pm
Mon June 22, 2015

Gov. Haley Announces New Push To Remove Confederate Flag In S.C.

South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley along with Sens. Tim Scott and Lindsey Graham (right, far right) and other lawmakers and activists call for the Confederate flag to be moved from state Capitol grounds.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 12:31 pm

South Carolina's most prominent political leaders say it's time for their state to stop flying the Confederate battle flag on the grounds of its Statehouse. Gov. Nikki Haley made their position clear Monday afternoon, speaking alongside Sen. Lindsey Graham, Sen. Tim Scott and others.

Calls for moving the Confederate battle flag have grown since the shooting of nine black church members in Charleston last week. After speaking about the efforts to cope with that tragedy, Haley said that she has seen "the heart and soul" of South Carolina.

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The Two-Way
2:32 pm
Mon June 22, 2015

'We Are Not Cured': Obama Discusses Racism In America With Marc Maron

President Barack Obama participates in a podcast with Marc Maron in Los Angeles, on Friday.
Pete Souza The White House

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 3:24 pm

President Obama talks about his own life, America's race relations and the trouble with politics during the much-anticipated new episode of the WTF with Marc Maron podcast, in an interview that is making headlines for its candid discussion of race.

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The Two-Way
5:47 pm
Fri June 19, 2015

Confederate Flag 'Has To Come Down' In S.C., NAACP Leader Says

A Confederate flag that's part of a Civil War memorial on the grounds of the South Carolina State House flies during a Martin Luther King Day rally in 2008. The state is under fire for continuing to fly the flag.
Chris Hondros Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 20, 2015 8:43 pm

Calling Wednesday's killing of nine black church members in Charleston, S.C., a hate crime, the head of the NAACP says it's not appropriate for South Carolina to keep flying the Confederate flag at its state house.

"The flag has to come down," NAACP President Cornell Brooks told a crowd gathered for a midday news conference Friday.

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The Two-Way
12:59 pm
Fri June 19, 2015

Doctors, Nurses Among 243 Charged In Million-Dollar Medicare Schemes

Attorney General Loretta Lynch speaks about a federal crackdown on Medicare fraud. With her are HHS Inspector General Daniel R. Levinson (from left), HHS Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell, FBI Director James B. Comey and Assistant Attorney General for the Criminal Division Leslie R. Caldwell.
T.J. Kirkpatrick Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 19, 2015 2:59 pm

Federal agents have arrested 243 people — including 46 doctors, nurses and other medical professionals — who are accused of running up more than $700 million in false Medicare billings. Charges range from fraud and money-laundering to aggravated identity theft and kickbacks.

Attorney General Loretta Lynch calls it "the largest criminal health care fraud takedown in the history of the Department of Justice."

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The Two-Way
11:02 am
Fri June 19, 2015

'They Will Strafe You,' Bird Expert Says Of Seattle's Dive-Bombing Crows

A crow dives on a researcher during a trial. Crows recognize people who have scared them or wronged them for years afterward.
Courtesy of Keith Brust

It has become an annual process: Crows swoop down on unsuspecting Seattleites, who then call wildlife professor John Marzluff, who explains that it's simply the season for crows to dive-bomb people — and that they're mostly harmless.

The behavior, Marzluff tells member station KUOW, is tied to something many parents can understand: the empty nest.

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The Two-Way
3:16 pm
Thu June 18, 2015

Kids' Art Show Takes Over 2 Billboards In Times Square

Who? by Sharon Yang, 10, a fifth-grader in Brooklyn. Of this work, she says: "I put a lot of effort in my artwork to make the texture on the tree and the feathers on the owl."
Isaak Liptzin WNYC

Originally published on Fri June 19, 2015 6:49 am

For the next few days, two large billboards in New York's Times Square are being given over to art created by the city's public school students. The project highlights students' work that's part of a new exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

"Art is my favorite subject. It lets me see new things," artist and fifth-grader Sharon Yang told a crowd Wednesday, according to member station WNYC.

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The Two-Way
12:21 pm
Thu June 18, 2015

'Mother Emanuel' Church Suffers A New Loss In Charleston

The Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C., has overcome fire, earthquakes and hurricanes in its nearly 200-year history.
Randall Hill Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat June 20, 2015 8:47 pm

In the Holy City, it's called "Mother Emanuel." Charleston's Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church has a long history in which its existence was threatened — or even banned outright. Every time, the church that was the scene of Wednesday's mass shooting has survived and rebuilt.

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