Amy Rogers

Coordinator of WFAEats

Amy Rogers is the author of Hungry for Home: Stories of Food from Across the Carolinas and Red Pepper Fudge and Blue Ribbon Biscuits. Her writing has also been featured in Cornbread Nation 1: The Best of Southern Food Writing, the Oxford American, and the Charlotte Observer. She is founding publisher of the award-winning Novello Festival Press. She received a Creative Artist Fellowship from the Arts and Science Council, and was the first person to receive the award for non-fiction writing. Her reporting has also won multiple awards from the N.C. Working Press Association. She has been Writer in Residence at the Wildacres Center, and a program presenter at dozens of events, festivals, arts centers, schools, and other venues. Amy Rogers considers herself “Southern by choice,” and is a food and culture commentator for NPR station WFAE.

What’s your favorite childhood food memory? Watching my mother in a gorgeous cocktail dress sneak into the kitchen before a party so she could eat some real food.

What’s your typical breakfast? Coffee, with a side order of extra coffee

What can you always find in your fridge? Half-and-half. Because you can put it in coffee, tea, cereal, frittatas, and lots of leftover things like tomatoes, potatoes and shellfish to make cream-of-whatever soup.

Kitchen tool(s) you can’t live without? I lived and cooked wonderful meals for literally decades with only one chef’s knife. I now have others but rarely use them.

If you aren’t in the kitchen, where are you? Visiting farm stands, markets, cafes, friends’ homes – anywhere there’s food to be sampled and enjoyed.

Amy Rogers’ website

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WFAEats
11:32 am
Thu October 18, 2012

Across The Miles

Florentines
Amy Rogers

The world may be getting smaller but 10,000 miles between friends is still an impossible distance. So when my friends Stephanie and Marc announced last fall they were moving from Charlotte to Australia, I was crushed. They bequeathed to me the entire contents of their pantry and liquor cabinet, but that did little to help.

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WFAEats
12:00 am
Thu October 4, 2012

Celebrate! It’s National Sausage Month

Grilled sausages are getting their due during National Sausage Month!

“Those who respect law and love sausage should watch neither being made,” goes a familiar quote.*

Here at WFAEats, we don’t wade into matters of law. But we just learned October is National Sausage Month. What’s more, we got word of upcoming classes in the Art of Sausage-Making at Central Piedmont Community College. So it’s prime time for those of you who may have a hankering to make your own hand-stuffed, -shaped or smoked meat products.

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WFAEats
6:49 pm
Wed September 5, 2012

A “Sweet” Choice For America

If entrepreneurship had a face, it would look a lot like Nila Nicholas’.

In just a few short weeks, the Charlotte-based “candy stylist” has rocketed from a modest local presence all the way to the stratosphere: Her work is being included in 100 gift bags President Obama will bestow on his personal friends in honor of the Democratic National Convention.

Nicholas designs custom candy buffets, sweets tables, and delectable favors for parties and events. Pick a theme or a color scheme, and she’ll fashion a mouth-watering spread.

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WFAEats
2:04 pm
Wed August 29, 2012

Sympathy Salmon

Salmon with spinach and potatoes.
Andurinha/Flickr
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WFAEats
7:11 am
Wed July 18, 2012

Eating On A Food Stamp Budget: Wrap Up

Day 7 and Beyond

“How did you do on the ‘food stamp’ challenge?” That’s the question people have been asking me since Sunday. “Did you have enough to eat, or did you have to cheat?”

I recently completed the SNAP Challenge, designed to give participants a taste of what it’s like to feed yourself with no more than the $31.50 per week you’d get if you relied solely on food stamps.

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WFAEats
12:00 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Eating Of A Food Stamp Budget: Day Six

SNAP recipients receive EBT (electronic benefit transfer) debit cards to use for their food purchases.

Day Six: “Who’s Hungry?”

On a long car trip when a fast food joint comes into view, someone will shout it.

“Who’s hungry?”

If you walk into your office with a giant pizza box in your hands, you can call out to your co-workers.

“Who’s hungry?”

When the holiday meal is ready after hours of waiting, it’s a summons to gather and share something special – or even sacred.

“Who’s hungry?”

Who IS hungry? This past week, that question has taken on a very different meaning for me.

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WFAEats
12:00 am
Fri July 13, 2012

Eating On A Food Stamp Budget: Day Five

Amy Rogers

Day Five: Rumors and Reasons

It’s not really about the food.

That’s what I’m starting to realize. People are angry, exhausted, frustrated, despondent. Resentful, worried, afraid or annoyed – but no one I’ve talked with in the last five days is blasé on the topic of food stamps and other programs that help feed the hungry.

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WFAEats
4:32 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

Eating On A Food Stamp Budget: Day Four

Leftovers
Amy Rogers

Time for a mid-week reality check. The jug of milk has started to go sour. The fat in the leftover ground beef we cooked with last night’s spaghetti sauce has congealed into a bright orange slick. I may have just busted my budget by opening a Dollar Tree bag of Twizzlers I discovered in the pantry.

And I hate oatmeal.

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WFAEats
12:00 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Eating On A Food Stamp Budget: Day Three

Spaghetti

“I want spaghetti for dinner,” said a young friend who was visiting me Tuesday.

“We don’t have any.”

She just looked at me and rolled her eyes. So we got in the car to spend the last $5.22 remaining from my $31.50 grocery budget for the week.

So far I’ve managed to feed myself well on the basic, staple items I bought for the SNAP* Challenge. But how do you explain to a child that tonight’s dinner will be cereal or soup again?

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WFAEats
12:00 am
Tue July 10, 2012

Eating On A Food Stamp Budget: Day Two

Rotel seasoned tomatoes marked down to 14 cents a can at Target.
Amy Rogers

Yesterday I was feeling pretty smug about my cost-effective shopping. I’d spent only about half of the $31.50 grocery budget I’d agreed not to exceed as part of the SNAP* Challenge.

Then something happened to shake my confidence in my plan to make the supplies last an entire week. I realized I needed to factor in the cost of items I’d previously purchased or had on hand if I wanted to use them.

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