Amy Rogers

Coordinator of WFAEats

Amy Rogers is the author of Hungry for Home: Stories of Food from Across the Carolinas and Red Pepper Fudge and Blue Ribbon Biscuits. Her writing has also been featured in Cornbread Nation 1: The Best of Southern Food Writing, the Oxford American, and the Charlotte Observer. She is founding publisher of the award-winning Novello Festival Press. She received a Creative Artist Fellowship from the Arts and Science Council, and was the first person to receive the award for non-fiction writing. Her reporting has also won multiple awards from the N.C. Working Press Association. She has been Writer in Residence at the Wildacres Center, and a program presenter at dozens of events, festivals, arts centers, schools, and other venues. Amy Rogers considers herself “Southern by choice,” and is a food and culture commentator for NPR station WFAE.

What’s your favorite childhood food memory? Watching my mother in a gorgeous cocktail dress sneak into the kitchen before a party so she could eat some real food.

What’s your typical breakfast? Coffee, with a side order of extra coffee

What can you always find in your fridge? Half-and-half. Because you can put it in coffee, tea, cereal, frittatas, and lots of leftover things like tomatoes, potatoes and shellfish to make cream-of-whatever soup.

Kitchen tool(s) you can’t live without? I lived and cooked wonderful meals for literally decades with only one chef’s knife. I now have others but rarely use them.

If you aren’t in the kitchen, where are you? Visiting farm stands, markets, cafes, friends’ homes – anywhere there’s food to be sampled and enjoyed.

Amy Rogers’ website

Amy Rogers

Time for a mid-week reality check. The jug of milk has started to go sour. The fat in the leftover ground beef we cooked with last night’s spaghetti sauce has congealed into a bright orange slick. I may have just busted my budget by opening a Dollar Tree bag of Twizzlers I discovered in the pantry.

And I hate oatmeal.

“I want spaghetti for dinner,” said a young friend who was visiting me Tuesday.

“We don’t have any.”

She just looked at me and rolled her eyes. So we got in the car to spend the last $5.22 remaining from my $31.50 grocery budget for the week.

So far I’ve managed to feed myself well on the basic, staple items I bought for the SNAP* Challenge. But how do you explain to a child that tonight’s dinner will be cereal or soup again?

Amy Rogers

Yesterday I was feeling pretty smug about my cost-effective shopping. I’d spent only about half of the $31.50 grocery budget I’d agreed not to exceed as part of the SNAP* Challenge.

Then something happened to shake my confidence in my plan to make the supplies last an entire week. I realized I needed to factor in the cost of items I’d previously purchased or had on hand if I wanted to use them.

Amy Rogers / WFAEats

Think you could manage on $31.50 a week for groceries? That’s the amount you’d get to spend if you had to rely solely on food stamps.

From July 9 through July 15, I’m taking the SNAP* Challenge. Its purpose is to give well-fed Americans a chance to experience the struggle an estimated 1 in 7 are facing every day in the U.S.

Although his name evokes fine dining and over-the-top celebrity events, a world-renowned restaurateur has opened a new restaurant in Charlotte: Wolfgang Puck Pizza Bar. The chef stopped by to visit recently and cordially answered a few questions about food, flavor – and football.

Let’s admit it: Picking out the perfect Mother’s Day gift is hard. Flowers die in days. Perfume spills. And no one wants junky jewelry.

But books? Ah, a book will always fit and will never need ironing. Even better, it invites the reader to relax, so in honor of the upcoming holiday, I asked some local experts for food-themed book suggestions.

The Passover Table

Apr 5, 2012
Flickr/aprillynn77

There’s an old joke about Jewish holidays, and what they signify. It goes like this: “They tried to kill us; they couldn’t; let’s eat.”

This is an admittedly simplistic statement, but it fittingly describes Passover, the solemn yet joyous holiday that takes place each spring.

Marsh Madness

Mar 29, 2012
Flickr/poppet with a camera.

The world of food has never been more competitive. Top chefs, iron chefs and cake bosses are stepping up to challenges on chopping blocks all around the U.S. and abroad.

And if you’ve been asking yourself, “When will we have a competition for the most amazing and exotic marshmallow?” we have your answer. It’s happening right now and it’s called MARSH Madness.

When you hear the words “heritage” and “heirloom” what comes to mind? For Chef Steve Pope, it’s chickens.

Pope will be visiting Charlotte’s 7th Street Public Market this Sunday, March 11 from 6:30 – 8:30 pm, for a special tasting, lecture and demonstration event.

Good Food, Not Guilt

Jan 6, 2006

(1/6/06) It's January! Time for a new start. For many of us, that means making resolutions about food. We launch new diets, and give up sugar or butter or wine. WFAE commentator and food writer Amy Rogers says enough already. She has a revised plan for staying healthy in 2006. Hear her suggestions.

Pages