Amy Rogers

Coordinator of WFAEats

Amy Rogers is the author of Hungry for Home: Stories of Food from Across the Carolinas and Red Pepper Fudge and Blue Ribbon Biscuits. Her writing has also been featured in Cornbread Nation 1: The Best of Southern Food Writing, the Oxford American, and the Charlotte Observer. She is founding publisher of the award-winning Novello Festival Press. She received a Creative Artist Fellowship from the Arts and Science Council, and was the first person to receive the award for non-fiction writing. Her reporting has also won multiple awards from the N.C. Working Press Association. She has been Writer in Residence at the Wildacres Center, and a program presenter at dozens of events, festivals, arts centers, schools, and other venues. Amy Rogers considers herself “Southern by choice,” and is a food and culture commentator for NPR station WFAE.

What’s your favorite childhood food memory? Watching my mother in a gorgeous cocktail dress sneak into the kitchen before a party so she could eat some real food.

What’s your typical breakfast? Coffee, with a side order of extra coffee

What can you always find in your fridge? Half-and-half. Because you can put it in coffee, tea, cereal, frittatas, and lots of leftover things like tomatoes, potatoes and shellfish to make cream-of-whatever soup.

Kitchen tool(s) you can’t live without? I lived and cooked wonderful meals for literally decades with only one chef’s knife. I now have others but rarely use them.

If you aren’t in the kitchen, where are you? Visiting farm stands, markets, cafes, friends’ homes – anywhere there’s food to be sampled and enjoyed.

Amy Rogers’ website

YourCastlesDecor / Flickr

Just when we think coffee can’t get any more miraculous, here comes the coffee nap.

It sure seems like an oxymoron. How is it possible to pair up getting wide-eyed with getting shut-eye?

It works like this: In the afternoon when fatigue sets in, you drink a cup of coffee, set your alarm for 20 to 30 minutes, then doze off. That's the perfect amount of time to let the caffeine kick in. You'll wake up alert and refreshed. Science says so.

Welcome to the “largest literary celebration in the world,” otherwise, known as National Poetry Month. April also marks the birthday of William Shakespeare.

What does any of this have to do with food? We’re glad you asked. Read on.

Sonnet 75: So Are You to My Thoughts as Food to Life

Oven Fresh /

While we suffer in the South under piles of pollen, the trees up North are behaving in a much more tasteful fashion. That’s because March is Maple Month, when the sap starts to flow.

Pat Conroy: A Memory

Mar 7, 2016
Amy Rogers

People were in line before the bookstore opened. Hundreds more were arriving to stand on the pavement for hours and wait their turn to enter the cozy shop jammed with easily 100 more. Pat Conroy talked and laughed and reminisced with just about everyone who came to get a book signed.

Amy Rogers / WFAEats

Nobody wants to hear food writers complain about their jobs, and rightly so. But given the recent experience of WFAEats contributor Tamra Wilson -- more about that later --  this is a good time to bust some myths about what food writers actually get to do.

Take Heart

Feb 9, 2016
DWilliam's /

Just when we think our poor hearts can't take another pounding (we still love you, Panthers), here comes Valentine's Day. 

And like a game where it feels like the whole world is watching, the stakes are high. There’s not much margin for error. A fumble can get you sidelined. A couple of bad plays and you could forfeit the game entirely. Worst of all, the penalties can continue to accumulate even after the players have left the field.

Text and photographs copyright © 2013 by Jeffrey Taylor Mathis. Used by permission of the University of North Carolina Press.

No one predicted the Carolina Panthers would go to the Super Bowl – certainly not when Charlottean Taylor Mathis wrote The Southern Tailgating Cookbook: A Game Day Guide for Lovers of Food, Football, and the South back in 2013.

PHOTO/arts Magazine / flickr/

There are two kinds of people in the world: those who believe in the magical power of the slow- cooker, and those who don’t.

This writer has always been in the second camp. While I have no problem with the concept of cooking things slowly (hello, barbecue), the thought of setting out food to cook itself unsupervised has always seemed a little too futuristic, not to mention downright dangerous (hello, salmonella).

A Note Of Thanks

Nov 23, 2015
Amy Rogers / WFAEats

For a reporter the rule is pretty simple: You’re there to do a job, not be a guest at the event you’re covering.

Family Agriculture Resource Management Service

Here’s a fresh approach to bringing locally-grown fruits and vegetables to older folks who may lack access: a free Senior Nutrition and Produce Event this Saturday, Nov. 21.

Family Agriculture Resource Management Services (F.A.R.M.S.) has partnered with social service and advocacy groups to reach out to low-income seniors whom may not have transportation – or the resources – to obtain the greens, beans, and other garden bounty some of us may take for granted.