Alex Olgin

Health Reporter
Zuleyma Castrejon

The future of a program that shields some young immigrants from deportation is uncertain. Last week, a federal judge halted the Trump administration’s decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, until litigation can be heard. The Department of Justice appealed that case Thursday directly to the U.S. Supreme Court. That comes as Congress debates what to do with the program, which expires in March.

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

CMPD estimates at least 5,000 people attended Saturday's women's march in Charlotte. It was the second rendition of the march. A  year ago, more than 10,000 people packed uptown Charlotte one day after the inauguration of President Trump. Organizers billed this year's march as "Remarchable Women." 

N.C. Department of Health and Human Services

The recent scandal at Cardinal Innovations Healthcare angered many individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities waiting for services. The state took control of Cardinal in November because the behavioral healthcare organization spent excessively on salaries, parties and severance packages. Across the state there are almost as many people with intellectual and developmental disabilities waiting to get a complete array of home and community services as are currently getting them. For families it can last years, be frustrating and feel unfair.  

Alex Olgin / WFAE

The problems that resulted in the state taking over Charlotte-based Cardinal Innovations Healthcare can be boiled down to one word: Excessive.

Excessive executive pay, excessive parties, excessive resort retreats. Some of it violated state law – and none of it looked good for a taxpayer-funded organization that serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in 20 counties.

And when it comes to services, some the families that depend on Cardinal accuse it of penny-pinching. 

https://www.facebook.com/ketiememory

CMPD released video from a homicide that happened more than a year ago. The video shows in the distance 26-year-old Ketie Jones walking along The Plaza.  She was shot and killed on October 15, 2016 after a night out with friends in the Plaza Midwood neighborhood.  As WFAE's Sarah Delia reported earlier this year, "With no leads in her case, it's been a difficult time as her friends and family members reel from the randomness of her murder." 

North Carolina is one of 10 states that wants to add work requirements to its Medicaid program. Thursday the Trump Administration announced it's encouraging states to add these requirements for able-bodied adults.

Alex Olgin / WFAE

Hundreds of Salvadoran families living in Charlotte will likely be impacted by the Trump Administration’s decision to rescind temporary protected status for these immigrants. Many are trying to get answers about what this means for them.

Governor Roy Cooper visited this second grade class at Cotswold Elementary School which would have to make changes to comply with the smaller K-3 class size mandate.
Alex Olgin / WFAE

Governor Roy Cooper was in Charlotte Friday to make his pitch to lawmakers to give schools more money to implement smaller class sizes. He visited with second graders at Cotswold Elementary School. Legislators mandated that elementary schools get kindergarten through third grade classes below 18 students by next school year. While Cooper thinks the idea could improve learning, he said the current plan puts schools in a tough situation because no extra money has been dedicated.

Alex Olgin / WFAE

More than 300 uninsured people in Mecklenburg County will soon be able to get a drug that can prevent them from getting HIV. The county is funding this as part of a pilot project to reduce the spread of the deadly virus. Even though new infections have decreased in recent years, the county still has a new infection rate of 30.4 per 100,000 people. That's more than double the national average.

Healthcare.gov

Preliminary numbers show 8.8 million people bought health insurance plans through the federal exchange this year nationwide. That’s 96 percent of last year’s sign-ups, despite a lot of changes to the Affordable Care Act and a shorter window to enroll. Sign-ups in the Carolinas were also close to that of last year.  

Pages