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Sweetness And Light
3:41 am
Wed February 12, 2014

Double Axels And Death Spirals — Yes, Figure Skating Is A Sport

Russia's Maxim Trankov and Tatiana Volosozhar helped Russia take gold during the team figure skating competition in Sochi.
Adrian Dennis AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 7:57 am

With the addition of team figure skating to the Olympic manifest, I wasn't surprised to hear from my grumpy old pal the Sports Curmudgeon. "Hey, Frank," the crabby kibitzer said, "when you gonna admit that anything that calls itself a sport that has music outside o' halftime ain't a real sport?"

Actually, there are other sporting defenders of the faith who are even more critical. They maintain that any sport — like figure skating, gymnastics, diving, halfpipe — that is resolved by exterior judges rather than by the participants themselves is not a true sport.

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Art & Design
3:39 am
Wed February 12, 2014

At Last, New York Fashion Week Brings 'Good News For Real People'

Needleman says The Row has created an oversized sweater and sweater-skirt "that looks like if you were to lay down, you could just wrap it over yourself like a blanket and go to sleep."
Arno Frugier The Row Fall 2014 Collection

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 9:27 am

This year, the models on the runway at New York Fashion Week look downright comfortable — and Deborah Needleman, editor in chief of T: The New York Times Style Magazine, says that's "good news for real people."

In the semi-annual event, fashion editors and store buyers attend elaborate runway shows staged in tents at Lincoln Center and other locations around New York City. Designers present clothes to them that consumers may see in stores in the fall.

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The Salt
3:38 am
Wed February 12, 2014

The Full-Fat Paradox: Whole Milk May Keep Us Lean

A customer shops for milk at a Safeway in Livermore, Calif. Although it may seem counterintuitive, there's growing evidence that full-fat dairy is linked to reduced body weight.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 11:52 am

I have to admit, I melt at the creaminess of full-fat yogurt.

It's an indulgence that we're told to resist. And I try to abide. (Stealing a bite of my daughter's YoBaby doesn't count, does it?)

The reason we're told to limit dairy fat seems pretty straightforward. The extra calories packed into the fat are bad for our waistlines — that's the assumption.

But what if dairy fat isn't the dietary demon we've been led to believe it is? New research suggests we may want to look anew.

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Governing
3:37 am
Wed February 12, 2014

To Rent Or Buy? For The Federal Government, It's Complicated

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 3:25 pm

The Bureau of Indian Affairs has been in the hot seat in recent weeks for mishandling the leases for some of its office space. The Department of the Interior's inspector general found that BIA violated multiple rules, including overpaying for space and renting too much of it — in some cases without government authority to do so.

In all, the report found the BIA actions will cost taxpayers $32 million.

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The Picture Show
3:36 am
Wed February 12, 2014

In Photos: Moroccan Motorcycle Mashup

"Kesh Angels"
Hassan Hajjaj Courtesy of Taymour Grahne Gallery, New York

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 10:00 am

In the 1990s, Hassan Hajjaj assisted on a magazine photo shoot in Marrakesh when he had a realization: All the models, the photographer and even the clothes were from another country. Morocco, the country he grew up in, was simply the backdrop.

"From then I said it'd be great to present my people in their environment in their kind of way of dressing," he says in an interview on NPR's Morning Edition, "and play with it in that fashion way."

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Parallels
3:35 am
Wed February 12, 2014

Samba School Murder Exposes The Dark Side Of Rio's Carnival

Viviane Araujo, a Salguiero samba school queen, performs at a rehearsal for Carnival in Rio de Janeiro. Marcello da Cunha Freire, vice president of the popular samba school, was murdered last month in a drive-by shooting.
Lianne Milton for NPR

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 9:44 am

Carnival in Rio de Janeiro is a glittering affair that attracts tourists from all over the world. There is, however, a murky and sometimes violent underbelly to the celebrations that recently came under the spotlight after the murder of a top samba school official.

One evening last month, Marcello da Cunha Freire was leaving his office in Rio's Vila Isabel neighborhood when a car pulled up next to him.

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Parallels
3:34 am
Wed February 12, 2014

For Elephants And Rhinos, Poaching Trends Point In Wrong Direction

Two adult white rhinos stand in an enclosure at South Africa's Entabeni Safari Conservancy in 2012. Entabeni is one of the world's only dedicated orphanages for rhino calves whose parents were poached for their horns — a trend that is rising.
Stephane De Sakutin AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 4:48 pm

South Africa has a stable government that makes wildlife protection a high priority. But even in that country, there's been a dramatic surge in poaching, particularly for rhinos.

A decade ago, fewer than 100 rhinos were killed in a year. Last year, it was more than 1,000, says Dan Ashe, director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

"When you're talking about something that is more valuable than gold, and it is easily accessible, you're going to create the atmosphere where people are going to take advantage of that," he says.

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The Two-Way
9:15 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

NBC's Tom Brokaw Announces He Has Cancer, Says He's 'Optimistic'

Tom Brokaw, seen here at an event in Silver Spring, Md., last year, was diagnosed with a form of cancer last August.
Kris Connor Getty Images

Tom Brokaw, the NBC News correspondent who for years was one of America's favorite news anchors, has been diagnosed with multiple myeloma, a cancer that affects blood cells in bone marrow, the network says.

Saying that Brokaw "and his physicians are very encouraged with the progress he is making" as he undergoes treatment, NBC released a statement on Brokaw's behalf. Here it is:

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The Two-Way
7:38 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

European Union Moves To Approve U.S. Genetically Modified Corn

Despite efforts by two-thirds of its 28 member states to block the move, the European Union took a large step toward approving a new genetically modified corn Tuesday. It opponents say the corn, a DuPont Pioneer product called TC1507, has harmful qualities. They also predict the decision will prove to be controversial in Europe.

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The Salt
7:11 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

Thank You, Shirley Temple, For The Original 'Mocktail'

A Classic Shirley Temple
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 8:38 pm

Generations of little girls have watched the ebullient Shirley Temple light up Depression-era black and white films, her glossy curls bouncing and her voice chirping. Generations, too, developed a taste for the Shirley Temple drink — traditionally, ginger ale with a dash of grenadine, maraschino cherry and lemon for garnish.

The drink, it seems, has a shelf life as long as her movies.

That's because the saccharine beverage in a girly pinkish hue has long embodied glamour in a glass for tweens and the younger set.

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