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U.S.
11:54 am
Tue November 5, 2013

Ban The Box: Some Companies Stop Asking Job Applicants About Criminal History

Big box retailer Target said it will remove questions about prior arrests on its job applications, but many companies still ask. Host Michel Martin speaks with Madeline Neighly from the National Employment Law Project and Elizabeth Milito from the National Federation of Independent Businesses about the pros and cons of the practice.

Books
11:54 am
Tue November 5, 2013

Going On 'The Baby Chase' From Arizona To India

Stevy Fletcher St. Martin's Press

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 4:23 pm

Many couples who struggle with infertility say they would go to the ends of the earth to have a child. Some use surrogate mothers in the United States, but the high cost and legal complications keep that option out of reach for many families. So some Americans are going global --to countries like India– to make it happen.

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Africa
11:54 am
Tue November 5, 2013

Reporter's Notebook: Ofeibea Quist-Arcton On Nigeria

Hundreds of people have been killed in northern Nigeria this year. The violence is blamed on Boko Haram, an extremist group that claims to be fighting against westernization. Host Michel Martin learns more from NPR's Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, who recently visited the town where Boko Haram was born.

Law
11:54 am
Tue November 5, 2013

Does Equal Justice For All Include The Poor?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Today, we're going to spend some time talking about some important issues in criminal justice, including what happens after people have served their time. Retailer Target recently announced that it would remove questions about an applicant's criminal history from the initial job applications, but many companies still do it. We'll talk about why this has become a growing focus of advocates.

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Parallels
11:53 am
Tue November 5, 2013

What Story Would You Like To See From Jerusalem?

NPR's Jerusalem correspondent Emily Harris gathers sounds in the Gaza Strip, where sewage is being pumped into the Mediterranean Sea.
Courtesy Emily Harris

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 12:21 pm

Before I moved to Jerusalem to cover Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, I asked friends and acquaintances what they wanted to know about these places.

Everyone knew something about the long-running conflict, the repeat political players, and the ancient religions and the historic significance of the land. But people had plenty of questions, too.

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Shots - Health News
11:17 am
Tue November 5, 2013

For Many Workers, It's Time To Consider Insurance Options

It's open enrollment time again, the autumn period when many people with job-based health insurance ante up for another year.

Although news reports have fixated on the problems with the online health marketplaces that launched Oct. 1, for the vast majority of people that's a nonissue. If they get insurance through a job at a company that has at least 50 employees, they probably won't be using the marketplaces, also called exchanges.

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Parallels
11:06 am
Tue November 5, 2013

In Congo's Long-Running War, Rebels Call Off Insurgency

Leaders of the M23 rebel group gather near the eastern city of Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo, in June. The group, which recently suffered several military defeats, announced Tuesday it was calling off its nearly 2-year-old rebellion.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 4:19 pm

There's rare good news from the Democratic Republic of Congo, a country that has hosted one of the world's deadliest and longest-running wars.

M23, the most active rebel group in the country, said it was laying down its weapons and ending a nearly 2-year-old rebellion that had wrecked havoc on the eastern part of Congo.

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It's All Politics
11:02 am
Tue November 5, 2013

9 Elections To Watch

Republican Gov. Chris Christie listens as Democratic challenger Barbara Buono answers a question during a debate at Montclair University in Montclair, N.J., on Oct. 15.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 6:19 pm

Tuesday's elections are anything but dull. From the Eastern Seaboard to the Pacific Northwest, there's a colorful and compelling roster of political contests. Although there isn't anything close to the drama of an Election Day in a presidential year, many of the races have national implications.

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The Two-Way
10:46 am
Tue November 5, 2013

Brazil Admits It Has Spied On U.S. Diplomats

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff takes part in the meeting of the Economic and Social Development Council, at Planalto Palace, in Brasilia, on February 27, 2013.
Pedro Ladeira AFP/Getty Images

When a Brazilian newspaper published a report that the U.S. had spied on Brazilian President Dilma Rouseff, the country complained bitterly. Rouseff even postponed a state visit with President Obama.

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Shots - Health News
10:32 am
Tue November 5, 2013

Insurance Cancellations: The Price Of Mending A Broken System?

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 12:36 pm

Lisa Dieckman, a retired psychologist in Los Angeles, likes the Affordable Care Act's promise that everybody can get health insurance. But she's not happy about being told she can't keep her own coverage and will have to pay considerably more for a policy she doesn't consider any better.

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