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7:06 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Scientists Help Western States Prepare For Drought As New Norm

Frank Gehrke, chief of snow surveys in California, looks at wind speed, snow depth and moisture data collected at a survey site in Yosemite National Park.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 10:23 pm

At a 10,000-foot summit in Yosemite National Park, Frank Gehrke clicks into his cross-country skis and pushes off down a small embankment onto a meadow of crusty snow. He's California's chief of snow surveys, one of the most influential jobs in a state where snow and the water that comes from it are big currency. He's on his monthly visit to one of a dozen snowpack-measuring stations scattered across the high country of the Sierra Nevada.

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The Two-Way
6:42 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

U.S. Warns Airlines Over Potential Explosives In Toothpaste Tubes

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 12:49 pm

Officials from the Department of Homeland Security say they are warning airlines that terrorists traveling on Russian-bound planes could try to pack explosives into toothpaste tubes.

NPR's Brian Naylor reports the warning comes just as the Winter Olympics are set to kick off in Sochi. He filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"The department says it is issuing a warning to airlines flying to Russia including flights originating in the U.S. out of an abundance of caution.

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The Two-Way
6:32 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

'Almost Otherworldly': The Sea Caves Of Lake Superior, On Ice

Scenes from the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore in Bayfield, Wis., where Lake Superior's ice is thick enough to walk to the area's sea caves for the first time in five years.
Derek Montgomery for MPR News

Originally published on Mon February 10, 2014 5:28 pm

This winter's intense cold has brought a fringe benefit to people who live around southern Lake Superior: They can walk to the uniquely beautiful, and currently frozen, sea caves of the Apostle Islands. It's the first time the lake's ice in that area has been thick enough to walk on since 2009.

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Science
5:39 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Chemical Study Becomes A Tale of Conspiracy And Paranoia

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 10:23 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Now, the strange story of Tyrone Hayes. The biologist has devoted much of his career to studying a common herbicide used on corn, called atrazine; specifically, its effects on amphibians. Hayes believes the chemical impedes the sexual development of frogs, and he's publicly argued against the use of atrazine and criticized the corporation that makes it, Syngenta.

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Business
5:39 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

For CVS CEO, Tobacco Decision Reflects Health Care Priorities

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 10:23 pm

CVS CEO and President Larry Merlo joins Audie Cornish to discuss his company's big decision to eventually discontinue its sales of tobacco products. The decision didn't simply make headlines on Wednesday; it could also signal a shift in plans for the pharmacy giant's future.

Business
5:39 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Drug Store Plans To Rid Its Shelves Of Tobacco Products

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 10:23 pm

The pharmacy giant CVS plans to eliminate cigarettes and other tobacco products from its stores by October. The company says it made the decision because the drug store business is changing and that selling cigarettes is no longer consistent with its mission. Medical experts and the White House hailed the move. NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports.

Middle East
5:39 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Under A Hail Of Barrel Bombs, An Exodus Departs From Aleppo

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 10:23 pm

For the last two weeks, the barrel bombing of the rebel-held area of Aleppo in Syria has intensified. Warplanes drop leaflets on neighborhoods warning civilians to flee — and it seems they're listening. Residents of Aleppo districts held by the regime say they are seeing an influx of families, while aid agencies working in Turkey say hundreds of thousands of the displaced are trying to get in.

Religion
5:39 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

UN Report Raises Scathing Criticisms Of Vatican

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 10:23 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Sports
5:39 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Before Taking The Ice, Olympian Gives Thanks For Family

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 10:23 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And finally this hour, a U.S. Olympic athlete in her own words. Kacey Bellamy plays defense for the U.S. women's hockey team. This is her second trip to the Olympics. She was on the team that made it to the final round in Vancouver in 2010. They lost to Canada, 2-0. Bellamy grew up in Westfield, Massachusetts. And as she prepares for this year's games, she took some time to reflect on the role her family has played in her career.

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Law
5:39 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

An Surprising Crusader Against Wrongful Convictions

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 10:23 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

2013 saw a record number of exonerations in the U.S.; 87 prisoners were set free after they were shown to have been falsely convicted of crimes. That's according to a study of exoneration, released this week by law school researchers who study these cases.

Craig Watkins has been a trailblazer in re-examining questionable convictions. And what's surprising is that he's a prosecutor. He's the district attorney of Dallas County. When he took office, he created a Conviction Integrity Office, the first of its kind in the country.

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