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Simon Says
10:34 am
Sat February 15, 2014

Shirley Temple's Films Still Charm After All These Years

Shirley Temple started performing in films when she was just 3 years old.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 10:47 pm

Shirley Temple really could be as effervescent as a jolt of ginger ale and as cheery as a maraschino cherry in the kid's cocktail that is still ordered by her name. When Shirley Temple Black, the name she used after her marriage to Charles Black, laughed — and she liked to laugh — tears came to her eyes.

She told us how once she'd been called to jury duty, and learned the case involved erotic bondage.

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Sports
9:54 am
Sat February 15, 2014

Emotions Run High For Olympic U.S.-Russia Hockey Game

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 1:13 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. The big event today at the Winter Olympic Games in Sochi is the U.S.A.-Russia men's hockey game. It is already underway in the Bolshoi Ice Dome. The U.S.A. or Russia can lose and still make the finals but the emotional stakes of these two old rivals meeting today in Russia is huge. NPR's Robert Smith is at the game. He sent us a list of how he prepared for the big event.

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Commentary
9:54 am
Sat February 15, 2014

Frozen Ottawa Transforms Into 'Winterlude' Wonderland

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 1:13 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

In Ottawa, Canada, winter's something to celebrate. Each year, the city turns out for a three-week festival, complete with ice sculpting, music, fireworks, and skating on the city's frozen canals, essentially the world's largest ice rink. North Country Public Radio's Sarah Harris spent an afternoon on the ice and sent this audio postcard.

(SOUNDBITE OF ICE SKATING)

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Commentary
9:54 am
Sat February 15, 2014

Three Years Later, A Harrowing Visit To Fukushima

A Tokyo Electric Power Company official (center) stands with journalists at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan on Nov. 7. Cleanup efforts at the plant remain ongoing.
Kimimasa Mayama AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 10:46 pm

On Thursday night, I stayed at a motel in the town of Hirono, just outside a restricted zone in Fukushima Prefecture. The motel's residents were all men, all apparently working on the cleanup of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, where three reactors melted down and a fourth caught on fire after a quake and tsunami in 2011.

I was told that, except for a few elderly residents, most of Hirono's inhabitants had left for other places.

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Middle East
9:54 am
Sat February 15, 2014

Beirut's Suburbs Take New Precautions As Syrian Unrest Expands

Many shops in this area of Beirut, Lebanon, known as the Dahiyeh, are now lined with sandbags to shield them against possible bombings.
Tim Fitzsimons for NPR

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 10:45 pm

Riding the bus to Beirut's southern suburbs used to be a bumpy, crowded but fun experience. Everyone crammed in next to each other, bouncing around on the way to the area they call the Dahiyeh, the Arabic word for "suburb."

This sprawling southern district of Lebanon's capital is the place where the Shiite militant group Hezbollah enjoys its strongest support. But it is also a bustling, residential area. There are garages and vegetable stalls. And in the center of the neighborhood, there are juice bars and cafes.

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Middle East
9:54 am
Sat February 15, 2014

Libya's Slow And Bloody Path Toward Stability

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 1:13 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. This month marks the third anniversary of Libya's uprising against a brutal dictator, Moammar Gadhafi. After a bloody civil war, he was ousted and later killed - and now Libya is trying to rebuild itself. But the process has been slow. The divided nation still has a weak government and is awash with weapons. NPR's Leila Fadel has just returned from Tripoli and joins us from Cairo. Leila, thanks so much for being with us.

LEILA FADEL, BYLINE: Thanks for having me.

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Food
9:54 am
Sat February 15, 2014

Performance Drinks Pour Liquid Fuel Into Olympic Athletes

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 1:13 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

You know, athletes burn a tremendous number of calories in competition and training and with the Olympics underway we got to wondering just what they consume to recover from a workout and fortify themselves for upcoming events. So we're reached nutritionist Nanna Meyer in Sochi. She teaches at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs and she is the U.S. Olympic speedskating team sport dietician there are the games.

Thanks very much for being with us.

NANNA MEYER: Thanks very much for having me.

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Digital Life
9:54 am
Sat February 15, 2014

An App On The Search For The Secret To Happiness

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 1:13 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Social scientists have a new way of researching happiness. Now, for years you had to ask somebody why they were happy in order study what makes somebody happy, but that's been hard to do every minute of every day until now. Guy Raz of the TED Radio Hour explains.

GUY RAZ, BYLINE: Matt Killingsworth is a scientist who...

MATT KILLINGSWORTH: ...studies the causes and nature of human happiness.

RAZ: Which used to mean bringing people to a lab and interviewing them and trying to figure out...

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Arts & Life
9:54 am
Sat February 15, 2014

The Thousands Of Ways To Tie A Tie

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 1:13 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Author Interviews
9:54 am
Sat February 15, 2014

'Eliot Ness': Actually Untouchable, Except When It Came To Women

Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 10:44 pm

Hollywood's been known to dramatize even the most dramatic of real-life narratives. So of course the real Eliot Ness wasn't nearly as dashing as Robert Stack or Kevin Costner (although maybe he was).

He wasn't a G-man; he never carried an FBI badge. Nor was he the lawman who brought the tax case that put away America's most famous mobster, Al Capone — even though the Capone case made him a household name. But he was a genuine pioneer of modern police work.

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