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5:02 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Singapore Is Now The World's Most Expensive City

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 8:04 am

Singapore bumped Tokyo from the top spot and beat out Paris, London and Hong Kong because of its high cost of living. The report was released by the Economist Intelligence Unit.

NPR Story
5:02 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Syria Falls Behind Destroying Its Chemical Weapons

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 8:04 am

Linda Wertheimer gets a progress report on Syria's disposal of chemical weapons from Amy Smithson, an expert at the Center for Non-Proliferation Studies.

NPR Story
5:02 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Russia Maintains Grip On Ukraine's Crimean Peninsula

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 1:57 pm

As Russia strengthens its military control over Crimea, what options and obligations do the U.S. and its NATO allies have to protect Ukraine? David Greene talks to retired Adm. James Stavridis.

NPR Story
5:02 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Sarah Dooley Releases Debut Album 'Stupid Things'

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 9:35 am

Dooley became a campus celebrity as an undergraduate at Columbia University. She won over Internet critics with a comedy Web series. She combines sweetness and irony in some irreverent lyrics.

Shots - Health News
3:52 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Drugmakers Slash Spending On Doctors' Sales Talks

Now that Eli Lilly & Co.'s antidepressant Cymbalta and some other blockbusters have gone generic, the company is spending less on promotional activities by doctors.
Darron Cummings AP

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 2:14 pm

Some of the nation's largest pharmaceutical companies have dramatically reduced payments to health professionals for promotional speeches amid heightened public scrutiny of such spending, a ProPublica analysis shows.

Eli Lilly & Co.'s payments to speakers dropped by 55 percent, from $47.9 million in 2011 to $21.6 million in 2012.

Pfizer's speaking payments fell 62 percent over the same period, from nearly $22 million to $8.3 million.

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The Salt
3:50 am
Tue March 4, 2014

In The New Globalized Diet, Wheat, Soy And Palm Oil Rule

The world is increasingly relying on a few dozen megacrops, like wheat and potatoes, for survival. Above, a wheat field in Arkansas.
Danny Johnston AP

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 9:21 am

These days you can fly to far corners of the world and eat pretty much the same food you can get back home. There's pizza in China and sushi in Ethiopia.

A new scientific study shows that something similar is true of the crops that farmers grow. Increasingly, there's a standard global diet, and the human race is depending more and more on a handful of major crops for much of its food.

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Shots - Health News
3:49 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Flagging Down Taxi Drivers To Sign Up For Obamacare

Yuvania Maldonado, a counselor for President Obama's health care law, speaks with Chicago taxi driver Mohammad Chaudri at a city office where taxi drivers go to renew their license.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 8:04 am

Dan Ware has been driving a taxicab in Chicago for more than a decade, but he still doesn't have what many jobs offer: health insurance.

"I'm without health coverage," he says.

And that's not unusual, says Chicago Public Health Commissioner Bechara Choucair. "What we know in Chicago is that around 70 percent of taxi drivers are uninsured," Choucair says.

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Movie Interviews
3:49 am
Tue March 4, 2014

A Psychological Game Of Casting For 'The Grand Budapest Hotel'

Ralph Fiennes portrays concierge Monsieur Gustave in The Grand Budapest Hotel, the actor' first project with director Wes Anderson.
Bob Yeoman Courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 9:34 am

Watching Wes Anderson's films can often feel like a tumble down a rabbit hole. With the opening credits comes entry into a world that's both weird and wonderful. The writer and director of movies like Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums and Moonrise Kingdom has long had a point of view that is completely original — even dating back to the fifth grade, when he and a friend dramatized a Kenny Rogers album.

"We built quite a nice set," Anderson recalls. "We just performed the whole album of The Gambler with puppets playing instruments."

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The Salt
3:48 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Europe Tells U.S. To Lay Off Brie And Get Its Own Cheese Names

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 9:19 am

What's in a name? It's an age-old question Juliet once asked Romeo in Shakespeare's famed play.

Today, it's a serious question between the U.S. and the European Union, which has said it wants U.S. food makers to stop using European names.

But depending on what food you're talking about, a name could be a lot, says Kyle Cherek, the producer and host of a TV show called Wisconsin Foodie.

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Author Interviews
3:48 am
Tue March 4, 2014

When War-Torn Rubble Met Royal Imagination, 'Paris Became Paris'

Le Pont Neuf, shown here in an 18th-century painting by Nicolas-Jean-Baptiste Raguenet, was completed in 1606 by Henry IV. The bridge's construction kicked off the reinvention of Paris in the 17th century. Today, it's the oldest standing bridge across the Seine.
Public Domain

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 8:04 am

Today, Paris is a city of light and romance, full of broad avenues, picturesque bridges and countless tourists visiting to soak in its charms.

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