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Asia
6:11 am
Sat March 30, 2013

'Think Again' About U.S. Impact On N. Korean Economy

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 10:34 am

For years, U.S. policy toward North Korea has been going on the premise that economic sanctions could deter North Korea from developing nuclear weapons. Host Scott Simon talks with David Kang, professor of international relations and business at the University of Southern California, about the state of the North Korean economy.

Europe
6:11 am
Sat March 30, 2013

Cypriots' New World Marred With Uncertainty

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 10:34 am

The eurozone bailed out Cyprus, but the years ahead will bring poverty, job losses and fewer opportunities. Host Scott Simon talks with Joanna Kakissis about the mood in Cyprus now.

Arts & Life
6:11 am
Sat March 30, 2013

A Fossilized Confection Baked For Easter 1807

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 10:34 am

A British couple believes they've come across a hot cross bun that was baked more than 200 years ago. Host Scott Simon explains.

The Two-Way
2:25 am
Sat March 30, 2013

The Slipper Didn't Fit: Elite 8 March On Without Cinderella

Scottie Wilbekin, No. 5 of the Florida Gators, passes the ball out between Sherwood Brown (No. 25) and Chase Fieler (No. 20) of the Florida Gulf Coast Eagles on Friday in the Dallas Cowboys Stadium in Texas.
Ronald Martinez Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 7:32 am

The "darlings" of the NCAA men's basketball tournament are "now no more," as CBS Sports reports. Florida Gulf Coast lost to University of Florida, 50-62.

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NPR Story
9:02 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Segment 2

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 9:21 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

You're listening to SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. And for the rest of the hour we're going to talk about collisions, space collisions, space impacts, with Erik Asphaug, who's Ronald Greeley chair of planetary geology, School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University. Welcome to SCIENCE FRIDAY.

ERIK ASPHAUG: Thanks very much, Ira.

FLATOW: You must be very busy since this last collision in Russia of this asteroid.

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NPR Story
9:02 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Segment 3

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 9:19 am

When does a story about science become science fiction? Cosmologist Lawrence Krauss and theoretical physicist Brian Greene discuss how to spin a yarn about string theory or the Big Bang, without hyping the science. And novelist Ian McEwan, whose books touch on neurosurgery and quantum field theory, talks about what science offers to fiction.

NPR Story
9:02 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Segment 1

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 9:26 am

The Sonoran Desert, which spans some 100,000 square miles in southwestern North America, is one of the most diverse desert ecosystems in the world. Host Ira Flatow and guests discuss some lesser known desert creatures, and explore the secret life of that American southwest icon, the saguaro cactus.

The Two-Way
7:07 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Cowboys Reach 6-Year, $108 Million Deal With Quarterback Tony Romo

Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo.
Jamie Squire Getty Images

The Dallas Cowboys have agreed to a 6-year deal worth $108 million with quarterback Tony Romo.

The team's website reports the deal has not been signed, but agreed-to terms stipulate that $55 million of that is guaranteed.

Dallascowboys.com reports:

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The Two-Way
6:00 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Grand Jury Indicts Dozens Of Atlanta Educators Over Cheating Scandal

Former Atlanta Public Schools Superintendent Dr. Beverly Hall, center, speaks with school board member LaChandra Butler Parks, left, and Cecily Harsch-Kinnane, vice chair of the board, right.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 6:34 pm

A grand jury has indicted dozens of Atlanta Public Schools educators caught up in a massive cheating scandal, NPR member station WABE reports.

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Theater
5:42 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

'Testament Of Mary': A Familiar Mother, In First Person

Fiona Shaw rehearses for her role as the Virgin Mary in The Testament of Mary. Irish novelist Colm Toibin's one-woman play opens April 22 at Broadway's Walter Kerr Theater.
Hugo Glendinning

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 7:55 pm

How do you play a character who's been depicted more than nearly any other character in all of Western civilization?

That's the challenge currently facing Irish actress Fiona Shaw, who in the past has played such well-known fictional characters as Harry Potter's Petunia Dursley and Marnie Stonebrook on HBO's True Blood -- not to mention titanic classical roles from Euripides' Medea to Shakespeare's Richard II.

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