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5:21 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Tech Companies Unlikely Voice In Immigration Debate

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 9:59 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Silicon Valley tech companies have pushed for sometime for the U.S. to let more foreign workers with computer skills into the country. It's an immigration issue, but it's not often mentioned in the same breath with immigration concerns of agricultural workers, for instance, in the San Joaquin Valley, a couple of hours drive away. To convince Congress to pass comprehensive immigration reform, people from these two walks of life may need to come together.

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Technology
5:21 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Tech Week Ahead: Old Meets New In Fight Over Streaming Media

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 9:59 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. And it's time now for All Tech Considered.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

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Technology
5:21 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Bracelet Aims To Keep Aid Workers Safe In Hostile Areas

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 9:59 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Finally in All Tech, technology you can wear. We've heard before about smart glasses, gloves and watches. Well now, a human rights organization in Sweden, called the Civil Rights Defenders, has developed a line of high-tech bracelets. They're designed specifically for aid workers in dangerous areas, and they could potentially save someone's life.

ROBERT HARDH: When a human rights defender is attacked, a distress signal is sent out to five people in the close proximity of that person who can act physically trying to rescue him or her.

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The Two-Way
4:51 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

U.S. Will Deploy Solid-Sate Laser Weapon On Ship Headed To Persian Gulf

The Laser Weapon System (LaWS) temporarily installed aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Dewey in San Diego, Calif.
John F. Williams U.S. Navy

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 6:54 pm

For the first time ever, the United States is deploying a solid-state laser weapon. The Laser Weapon System (LaWS) successfully destroyed a drone in flight during a test run and will head to the Persian Gulf aboard the USS Ponce as part of what the military is calling an "at-sea demonstration."

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Sports
4:50 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Leading Through Tragedy, Louisville's Hancock Kept Team Together

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 9:59 pm

Louisville player Luke Hancock isn't the most talented on the team, but his leadership played a key role keeping everyone focused after a devastating injury to teammate Kevin Ware. The Louisville Cardinals play the Michigan Wolverines in Monday night's NCAA men's college basketball finals.

Sports
4:50 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Two Sisters Bring Native America Bride To Women's NCAA

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 10:51 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Native American pride is being splashed across Indian country, especially in Oregon on lawn signs saying: Rez Girls Rock and You've been Schimmeled. Two dynamic sisters, Shoni and Jude Schimmel, have helped power the underdog Louisville Cardinals to the women's NCAA championship game. They go up against Connecticut tomorrow night. The Schimmel sisters grew up on the Umatilla Reservation in Oregon, and they thrill their fans with a style of play known as rez ball.

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The Two-Way
4:41 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Climate Change Could Equal Teeth-Rattling Flights

Fly the bumpier skies?
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 6:23 pm

Buckle up — climate change could make this a bumpy flight.

That's according to a newly published study by two British scientists who say increased levels of CO2 in the atmosphere will make "clear air turbulence" — which can't be easily spotted by pilots or satellites — more common over the North Atlantic. That means the potential for gut-wrenching flights between the U.S., Europe and points east.

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Around the Nation
3:55 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Struggling W.Va. Town Hopes Boy Scout Camp Brings New Life

Mount Hope, W.Va., population 1,400, was once a thriving coal town. Today, many of the storefronts in its tiny downtown sit empty.
Noah Adams NPR

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 9:59 pm

Picture a tiny town set along a creek in West Virginia. A mountain rises from the town's eastern edge, overlooking the 1,400 people living below. Then, July comes — and 50,000 people arrive on that mountain for the National Scout Jamboree.

The town is called Mount Hope. I've heard some call it "Mount Hopeless." The town went through the long, downward slump from the boom days of deep-mine coal, when it was a grand, small-town capital of coal mining.

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The Two-Way
3:47 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Webster Celebrates College Chess Title, As New Hire Pays Off

Webster University chess coach Susan Polgar, second from left, won two national titles at Texas Tech. When Webster hired Polgar last year, the entire Tech team followed her to St. Louis.
Alan Greenblatt NPR

If there's no such thing as bad publicity, how much is good publicity worth? Webster University wants to find out.

Last year, the university didn't have a chess team. On Sunday, its team took home the national college championship, the President's Cup, after winning what is often called the "Final Four" of chess.

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The Two-Way
3:23 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

After Tumultuous Three Years, Seattle Police Chief John Diaz Will Step Down

Seattle Police Chief John Diaz in 2009.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 3:32 pm

With his department under the watch of the federal government, Seattle Police Chief John Diaz announced today he was stepping down.

The Seattle Times reports:

"Diaz, who has been with the Seattle Police Department for more than 30 years, didn't say why he decided to retire now.

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