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Middle East
5:13 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Dozens Die In Clashes Outside Cairo's Republican Guard HQ

In Egypt, dozens of people were killed in a clash between protesters and security forces Monday morning. The Muslim Brotherhood says government forces fired on them. The military says the headquarters was stormed by protesters.

World
5:01 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Death Toll Expected To Go Higher In Canadian Train Disaster

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 5:47 am

At least five people have been killed in Canada, after a train carrying crude oil derailed in eastern Quebec on Saturday. Police say dozens of people have been reported missing. For more on the story, David Greene talks to Stephen Puddicombe, of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

Education
4:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Congress Called On To Reverse Student Loan Rate Increase

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:02 pm

Rates on federally subsidized Stafford loans, which help low and middle-income college students, doubled on July 1. There is now pressure for a deal to undo the increase. NPR's David Greene talks to Matthew Chingos, a fellow at the Brookings Institution's Brown Center on Education Policy.

Business
4:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 5:25 am

On Saturday, speaking to priests-in-training and nuns, Pope Francis said a car is necessary to do a lot of work, but it shouldn't be a fancy one. He said, "Just think about how many children are dying of hunger in the world." He added that seeing priests and nuns in the latest-model cars hurts him.

Economy
4:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

IMF Warns Of Global Slowdown

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 5:20 am

International Monetary Fund chief Christine Lagarde on Sunday singled out the U.S. Congress for failing to avert across-the-board spending cuts that slow down potential for growth. She called U.S. deficit reduction in 2013 excessively rapid and ill-designed.

Energy
4:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

'Gasland' Helped Add Fracking To U.S. Lexicon, Now There's A Sequal

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 8:12 am

The documentary Gasland inspired legions of "fracktivists" to oppose natural gas drilling booms across the country. Now the film has a sequel. Gasland Part II by director Josh Fox begins airing on HBO Monday night.

Business
4:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Emotions, Fees Play Major Roles For Individual Investors

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 5:17 am

In recent weeks, NPR's Uri Berliner took money from his personal savings account that was losing value to inflation and sought out various investments. What did he learn?

Sports
4:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Britain's Own Andy Murray Wins Men's Title At Wimbledon

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 5:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

People in Britain are celebrating a new Wimbledon tennis champion this morning, a man born on their own soil.

(APPLAUSE)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Game, that's a match...

GREENE: That's early applause from the crowd yesterday, just before Andy Murray won in straight sets beating Novak Djokovic. Murray's victory ends 77 years of heartbreak. The last Brit to win the Wimbledon men's title: Fred Perry in 1936.

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Music
4:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Vibraphone Showcased In Jason Marsalis' 'Ballet Class'

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 6:03 am

Each month, NPR Music asks public radio personalities at member stations across the country to tell us about a song they can't get enough of. David Greene introduces listeners to member station WWNO's Gwen Thompkins — she's NPR's former East Africa correspondent. Her choice for July's installment of "Heavy Rotation," is "Ballet Class" by the Jason Marsalis Vibes Quartet.

Parallels
3:52 am
Mon July 8, 2013

EU-U.S. Trade: A Tale Of Two Farms

Farmer Richard Wilkins, a firm believer in genetically modified crops, examines the corn crop at his farm in Greenwood, Del. U.S. and EU officials begin talks Monday on an ambitious free-trade agreement. One stumbling block is agriculture. Unlike the U.S., the EU bans the cultivation of genetically modified crops.
Jackie Northam/NPR

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:12 pm

U.S. and EU officials begin talks Monday on an ambitious free-trade agreement aimed at generating billions of dollars of new trade. But negotiators must overcome barriers created by cultural and philosophical differences over sectors like agriculture. In Europe, the cultivation of genetically modified crops is banned, while in the U.S., they are a central part of food production. NPR's Jackie Northam visited a farm in Delaware and NPR's Eleanor Beardsley visited one in Burgundy, France, to look at those deep-seated differences. We hear from Jackie first.

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