NPR News

Pages

Shots - Health News
12:10 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

How Midwives Have Become Critical In War Zones

A midwife holds a newborn at Rabia Balkhi Women's Hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan.
Jonathan Saruk International Medical Corps

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 7:24 pm

  • Listen to midwife Emily Slocum describe delivering babies in the dark, with no running water.

In a conflict zone, getting the basics — food, water, shelter — is a constant challenge. And it likely involves being on the move.

Now imagine pregnancy. There might not be a functioning medical facility for miles. And the environment makes the woman and her baby more susceptible to complications.

Aid groups are increasingly relying on conflict midwives to help women in these situations. In dangerous and unstable regions, midwives' jobs are more than delivering babies: They often have to help women who have experienced sexual violence and have reproductive health issues.

Read more
Politics
12:06 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

White House Talks Income Gap: New Ideas About Old Problems?

President Obama's economic speaking tour seems reminiscent of campaign speeches in 2008. Guest host Celeste Headlee asks NPR's Ron Elving why the White House is sending this message again.

Economy
12:06 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

White House Economics: Growing 'From The Middle Class Out'

President Obama is putting out a message of economic revitalization, starting with the middle class. Cecilia Munoz, Director of the White House Domestic Policy Council, explains why the executive branch is pushing the message now. She speaks with guest host Celeste Headleee.

Food
12:06 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

When Asian And Latin Food Collide: Spicy, Tasty Or Confused?

Green beans with peanuts and chile de arbol
Courtesy Pati Jinich

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 2:20 pm

Asian-Americans and Latinos trace their roots half a world away from each other — literally. But their cultures, and especially the foods they love, have more in common than you might think. These days, they're colliding in new and interesting ways – from Korean barbecue taco trucks to finer dining.

Read more
Television
12:06 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

What's The 'Best Daym Takeout' In America?

Food critic and YouTube sensation Daymon 'Daym' Patterson travels the country to find the best takeout spots. He eats in the front seat of his car - when the food is hottest and freshest. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with him about his new Travel channel show Best Daym Takeout.

Race
12:06 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

If You Have To Ask If It's Racist, It Probably Is

Talking about race can be difficult. But not for Andrew Ti, creator of the Yo, Is This Racist? blog and podcast. He bluntly takes on questions about racial sensitivity. Guest host Celeste Headlee asks Ti if he thinks he's helping or hurting the national conversation.

Music
12:06 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Hip-Hop Sign Language Is Hard Work

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 4:00 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE: This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee, Michel Martin is away. Coming up, having honest conversations about race can require a lot of patience, but the writer behind the "Yo, Is This Racist?" blog says there's value in getting angry and even profane in those debates.

Read more
Krulwich Wonders...
11:48 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Look What You've Done, North America!

Robert Krulwich NPR

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:25 pm

This is the story of two continents doing battle, North America versus South America. It is also a biological mystery.

For a very long time, North America and South America were separate land masses. The Pacific Ocean slipped between them, flowing into the Caribbean. The Isthmus of Panama was there, but it was underwater. The two continents didn't touch.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:31 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Reports: Virginia Johnson, Of 'Masters & Johnson' Fame, Dies

Virginia Johnson and her then-husband, William Masters, in 1972. They studied sexual behavior for decades. She died this week in St. Louis. Masters died in 2001.
AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 11:40 am

"Virginia Johnson, one half of the famed Masters and Johnson research team on human sexual behavior, has died at the age of 88, her son, Scott, tells St. Louis Public Radio."

The station adds that "Johnson was a resident of The Altenheim [a retirement home] in St. Louis, and the facility has also confirmed her death."

Read more
The Two-Way
10:42 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Big Coup For One Of The Big Three: Impala Called Best Sedan

The 2014 Chevrolet Impala, which Consumer Reports says its better than its foreign rivals.
Justin Lane EPA /Landov

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 11:12 am

The city of Detroit may be on the skids financially, but one of its traditional "big three" automakers just scored a big win.

For the first time since it began making such comparisons between sedans in 1992, Consumer Reports magazine has given its top rating to a model made by a U.S. automaker — not one made by a European or Japanese company.

Read more

Pages