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Asia
4:44 am
Wed April 17, 2013

IAEA Team Probes Fukushima's Radioactive Water

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 2:46 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On a Wednesday, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Environment
4:44 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Increased Carbon Dioxide Levels Damage Coral Reefs

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 2:46 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Business
4:35 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Seeing The World Through Goolge-Colored Glasses

Google co-founder Sergey Brin shows off Google Glass in February. Brin says the camera displays an external light when filming, making it difficult for a user to record surreptitiously.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 12:17 pm

Google Glass is no longer merely a prototype. The company began delivering its high-tech glasses to a select group of test customers Tuesday.

The gadget looks kind of like a pair of eyeglasses, except it doesn't always have lenses and it has a tiny screen, about the size of the end of my pinkie, perched just above and to the right of the wearer's right eye.

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Business
4:35 am
Wed April 17, 2013

American Airlines Blames Computers Issues For Cancellations

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 2:46 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Well, yesterday was not a day that you wanted to be traveling on American Airlines. The carrier cancelled all of its main routes for several hours, and also many of its commuter flights, as well. Almost 2,000 flights were infected in all. American blames computer networking problems.

NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports.

(SOUNDBITE OF CROWD CHATTER)

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Author Interviews
4:35 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Why Vaguely Defining Bullying Can Be A Problem

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 2:46 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

There's been a major push to prevent bullying in America's schools but some are now worried in our enthusiasm to tackle this social problem, we are creating new problems. Indiana is the latest state to pass a tough anti-bullying law. It requires schools to develop prevention programs and adopt rules for disciplining bullies, among other measures.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

We spoke to Emily Bazelon about this. Her new book on bullying is called "Sticks and Stones." Emily, thanks for joining us.

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Remembrances
4:35 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Long-Time Sports Broadcaster Pat Summerall Dies At 82

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 9:36 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

If you grew up watching football, you know the voice we're about to hear. If you grew up watching the Masters, you likely also know this voice. In fact, if you ever walked into a restaurant that just had its TV on over the bar, there's a good chance you heard the voice of Pat Summerall.

(SOUNDBITE OF SUPER BOWL BROADCAST)

PAT SUMMERALL: We're in the magic city of New Orleans. The buildup has been incredible for Super Bowl 31.

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Code Switch
4:35 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Seeking Oakland's Soul In The 'New Oakland'

A DJ plays for a crowded street at Oakland's Art Murmur celebration in February.
David Kashevaroff

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 8:17 pm

Oakland, Calif., was once a hub of African-American culture on the West Coast.

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National Security
4:35 am
Wed April 17, 2013

FBI Encourages Public To Turn Over What They May Know

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 2:46 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

The special agent in charge of the FBI Boston office hopes someone somewhere heard something that will point to a suspect in the Boston Marathon attack.

(SOUNDBITE OF STATEMENT)

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National Security
4:35 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Adding Security Along Marathons Would Be Herculean Task

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 2:46 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, the twin bombings at the Boston Marathon struck at a very special type of sporting event. Marathons have been called the most democratic of sports, with the fewest physical barriers between athlete and spectator.

NPR's Mike Pesca examines whether the attack could permanently damage that accessibility.

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Animals
2:56 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Lionfish Attacking Atlantic Ocean Like A Living Oil Spill

Lionfish, like this one spotted in the Bahamas, are a nonnative predatory fish that can decimate native fish populations.
Cammy Clark MCT/Landov

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 1:45 pm

A gluttonous predator is power-eating its way through reefs from New York to Venezuela. It's the lionfish.

And although researchers are coming up with new ways to protect some reefs from the flamboyant maroon-striped fish, they have no hope of stopping its unparalleled invasion.

Lad Akins has scuba dived in the vibrant reefs of the Bahamas for many years. But when he returned a couple years ago, he saw almost no fish smaller than his hand.

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