NPR News

Pages

The Salt
4:32 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

When Cheeseburger = Walking, Will We Eat Less?

Would you like that burger with a side of exercise?
iStockphoto.com

Nutrition labeling has been required on packaged food since 1990, and the new federal food safety law will require calorie counts to be posted for restaurant food — all in an effort to get the American public to eat healthier.

But most studies on calorie count labels show they don't do much to nudge people toward better food choices. If I want that oh-so-delicious Chunky Monkey ice cream, knowing that a half-cup serving delivers 300 calories and 18 grams of fat isn't going to stop me.

Read more
Planet Money
4:26 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Has The Cupcake Bubble Finally Popped?

Back in 2010, our own Jacob Goldstein called the cupcake craze a "bubble of historic proportions." He called it too early.

The following year, Crumbs Bake Shop went public, and Jacob began to doubt himself.

Read more
Business
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Investors Pessimistic About Apple's Growth Potential

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. This afternoon, investors watched even more closely than usual as Apple released its quarterly earnings. The numbers beat Wall Street's gloomy expectations. But for the first time in a decade, Apple's profits fell from the same period a year earlier. NPR technology correspondent Steve Henn joins us from Silicon Valley to talk about today's results. Hey there, Steve.

STEVE HENN, BYLINE: Hi.

Read more
Latin America
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Venezuela Deeply Divided After Chavez Death, Recent Election

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The death of Hugo Chavez, Venezuela's bombastic and charismatic president, has left that country sharply divided. His handpicked successor, Nicolas Maduro, took over. He won a snap election, which gave the ruling party six more years. But Maduro's victory was slim. Nearly half the country supported his opponent, and that creates instability in one of the world's great oil powers. NPR's Juan Forero reports from Caracas on the uncertainty about Venezuela's future.

Read more
National Security
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Canada Case Raises Concern About Link Between Al-Qaida, Iran

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

A different terror plot was foiled yesterday in Canada. That's according to the Canadian government. Two men are in custody. They're accused of planning to derail a passenger train with explosives. Canadian authorities say the plot was supported by al-Qaida operatives in Iran. Iran denies that.

Is it credible; is there any formal relationship between Al-Qaida and Iran? It's a question that's been explored at least as far back as the 9/11 Commission.

Read more
World
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Relatives Of Bombing Suspects Shocked By Attacks

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now, to Dagestan in southern Russia. It's home to family members of the two Boston bombing suspects, including their parents, and they have been under siege by reporters in Dagestan. Today, the family cancelled a planned news conference, and it's now facing questions from the Russian security services. NPR's Corey Flintoff joins us from Dagestan. And, Corey, first of all, remind us why the parents are there and not in the U.S.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Allan Arbus, Who Played Psychiatrist On TV's 'M.A.S.H.,' Dies At 95

Allan Arbus on the left, with fellow M.A.S.H. stars Loretta Swit, Mike Farrell, Burt Metcalfe, Alan Alda, Kellye Nakahara Wallet and Wayne Rogers at an awards ceremony in 2009.
Alberto E. Rodriguez Getty Images

Allan Arbus, best known for his recurring role as psychiatrist Sidney Freedman on the hit television comedy M.A.S.H., has died at age 95, his family says.

Arbus died Friday due to congestive heart failure, his daughter said in a statement. His second wife, Mariclare Costello Arbus, told Reuters that her husband "just got weaker and weaker and was at home with his daughter and me" when he passed away.

Read more
World
4:04 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Routine On U.S. Racetracks, Horse Doping Is Banned In Europe

French jockey Olivier Peslier celebrates a win at Longchamps racecourse near Paris in 2012. While many drugs can legally be used on horses in U.S. racing, they are barred in Europe.
Fred Dufour AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:30 pm

At the famous Hippodrome de Longchamp just outside of Paris this month, crowds came to cheer and bet on the sleek thoroughbreds that opened horse racing season by galloping down the verdant turf course.

Horse racing in Europe is different from the sport in the U.S., from the shape and surface of the track to race distances and the season itself. Another big difference is doping.

Read more
Explosions At Boston Marathon
3:43 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Boston Search Shines Spotlight On Surveillance Cameras

An investigator inspects the area near a surveillance camera on the roof of the Lord & Taylor store near the Boston Marathon finish line on Thursday. That camera provided the first glimpse of the men who allegedly planted the bombs.
Julio Cortez AP

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Footage from surveillance cameras along the Boston Marathon route gave the FBI early clues about the bombing suspects. And prosecutors say they'll use some of those images to try to prove their criminal case against 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. But the proliferation of cameras in America's big cities is raising some tricky questions about the balance between security and privacy.

It was pictures of two brothers taken by a camera outside the Lord & Taylor department store that provided the first glimpse of the men who allegedly bombed the Boston Marathon.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:46 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Breaking Tradition, Cooper Union Will Charge Undergrads Tuition

The new Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art academic building is seen in Manhattan's Cooper Square in New York City.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 2:52 pm

Citing financial strain, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art announced that beginning in the fall of 2014, it would begin charging its undergraduate students tuition.

The college is one of the few institutions that doesn't charge students tuition.

Read more

Pages