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The Two-Way
2:19 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

French Court Charges Strauss-Kahn With 'Aggravated Pimping'

Dominique Strauss-Kahn, former head of the International Monetary Fund, leaves after a hearing before an investigation committee on capital flight at the French Senate in June.
Martin Bureau AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 2:47 pm

Dominique Strauss-Kahn, the former head of the International Monetary Fund who was forced to resign amid allegations of sexual misconduct in the U.S., faces charges of "aggravated pimping" before a court in his native France.

A trial date has not been set.

Strauss-Kahn, 64, stepped down as head of the IMF in 2011 after he was accused of sexually assaulting a New York hotel maid. Although those charges were later dropped, they derailed the politician's plans to run for the French presidency.

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Shots - Health News
2:16 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Cyclo-What? A Nasty Stomach Bug Spreads In The Midwest

Cyclospora is a tough parasite that can survive for weeks outside the human body.
CDC

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 11:45 am

It seems like the Midwest is a hotbed for medical mysteries these days.

Earlier this week, scientists traced a brand-new virus to ticks in Missouri. Now disease detectives are hot on the trail of another puzzling pathogen in the heartland.

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The Two-Way
1:56 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Dying 'Simpsons' Co-Creator Will Give His Fortune To Charity

Sam Simon in 2008.
Joe Corrigan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 7:03 pm

Sam Simon, who helped create The Simpsons and continues to earn "tens of millions" of dollars each year from royalties generated by the show, is dying from colon cancer.

Doctors say he has less than six months to live.

Here's the part of his story we especially want to pass along: When he's gone, the 58-year-old writer and producer says, his Simpsons royalties will go to charity. The donations will come on top of the millions he's given away since striking it rich as a younger man.

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Monkey See
1:06 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Fan Gatherings And Fall Television

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

We recorded this week's episode during the brief interregnum between the end of Glen Weldon's trip to the San Diego Comic Con and the beginning of Linda Holmes' two weeks at the Television Critics Association press tour in Los Angeles. So it seemed a perfect time to mine the two events for inspiration.

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Planet Money
12:49 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Stamps, Jeans, Beer: What Americans Want From North Korea

Can I buy a pair of jeans made in North Korea?
Office of Foreign Assets Control

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 12:01 pm

U.S. sanctions mean that any citizen or business wanting to buy stuff from North Korea has to send a letter to the U.S. government asking for special permission. A few months back, we submitted a Freedom of Information Act request, asking for those letters.

Our request was granted: We recently received a packet of 18 letters from Americans who wanted to do business with the most isolated nation on the planet. We've posted all of the letters online.

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The Salt
12:16 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

If It Crawls, It's Canned: Eating In The Alaskan Wilderness

Saving The Salmon Season: Prince of Wales Island residents Jenny and Tony Wise pack away plenty of jarred fish each year.
Courtesy of Jenny Wise

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 3:30 pm

Nobody throws away a mason jar on Prince of Wales Island. On this rugged mass of mountain, forest, river and sea in southeast Alaska, most of the several thousand year-round residents subsist at least partially off the generous fat of the land. And much of the bounty is pressure cooked, preserved and stored away for the future.

"If it stops crawling long enough, we'll put it in a jar," says Jon Rowan, a schoolteacher in the town of Klawock, on the island's west side.

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Animals
12:08 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

'Moth-ers' Shine a Light on Nighttime Beauties

Think moths are nothing more than drab, little brown fliers stalking your wool sweaters? The folks behind National Moth Week, happening now, want to change that perception. Rutgers University moth expert Elena Tartaglia describes the diversity of moths and the role that they play in nature, and gives some tips on how to become a "moth-er."

Sports
12:08 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Phil Mickelson Takes a Swing at Science

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Flora Lichtman. This next segment is specially dedicated to people for whom midsummer means lush greens, maybe a little sand and hopefully a lot of birdies. We're in the thick of golf season. The U.S. Open wrapped up last month, the British Open last weekend. And in just a few weeks, the PGA Championship begins. Up next, a look at the science of this sport. What sets the pros apart? Stroke mechanics, swing thoughts, physics, psychology?

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Mental Health
12:08 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Melding Two Memories Into One

Reporting in Science, researchers write of linking a mouse's innocuous memory of a room with a more fearful memory of getting an electric shock — causing the mouse to freeze in fear upon seeing the safe room. Study author Steve Ramirez of M.I.T. and memory researcher Mark Mayford of The Scripps Research Institute discuss the implications for modifying human memories.

Health
12:08 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

MERS Virus Update

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is an illness caused by a newly discovered virus in the same family as SARS. Most of the documented cases have come from Saudi Arabia, which has seen a 54 percent mortality rate in those patients. Martin Cetron, director of the Division of Global Migration and Quarantine at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, discusses the emerging virus.

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