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The Two-Way
7:23 am
Tue September 3, 2013

For Microsoft, Nokia's Phones Are 'Key To Everything'

That's a Nokia Lumia 820 smartphone snapping an image of a Windows icon.
Dado Ruvic Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 12:52 pm

Here's why Microsoft says its $7.2 billion deal to buy Nokia's smartphone business as well as that company's patents and services makes sense.

"It all starts with the phone," writes PCWorld, in a piece that analyzes why "the phone is key to everything."

According to the magazine:

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Tue September 3, 2013

An Alternate Universe Delights In Complex, Perplexing 'Duplex'

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 5:04 pm

You're walking your dog in a suburb that may or may not exist in this dimension. The dog whines. You ignore him. Anyway, you're too busy looking out for that sexy, evil sorcerer. Suddenly, a gray rabbit appears, and you realize: the world is ending.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Tue September 3, 2013

'At The Bottom' Of A Friendship, How Far Would You Go To Help?

Ben Dolnick's previous two books — Zoology (2007) and You Know Who You Are (2011) — have mostly dealt with young people coming of age. In his latest novel, At the Bottom of Everything, the writer's youthful coming-of-age tales start to themselves come of age. As teenagers, the waifish, ascetic Thomas Pell is the smartest kid at school, but socially awkward. Adam has just moved to Washington D.C. with his mother and new stepdad. The two boys quickly become fairly inseparable, getting up to fairly standard young person shenanigans.

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The Two-Way
6:50 am
Tue September 3, 2013

2 Million Syrians Are Now Refugees And More Are 'On The Way'

Syrian-Kurdish children sit on a bed at the Quru Gusik refugee camp in the Kurdish region of northern Iraq, on Aug. 22. Faced with brutal violence and soaring prices, thousands of Syrian Kurds have poured into Iraq's autonomous Kurdish region. UNICEF has reported that over one million Syrian children live as refugees in other countries.
Safin Hamed AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 12:08 pm

"The number of Syrians forced to seek shelter abroad since civil war began in March 2011 passed the 2 million mark on Tuesday with no sign of the outflow ending soon," the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees reports. Most are in neighboring nations.

About 1 million of the refugees, as we've previously reported, are children.

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Around the Nation
6:49 am
Tue September 3, 2013

U.S. Navy Wins Battle Of Lake Erie, Again

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with congratulations to the U.S. Navy, which won the battle of Lake Erie - again. Sailing ships re-enacted the victory over the British 200 ago during the War of 1812. The Port Clinton News Herald says the 2013 battle turned out the same, but with better technology: people captured the battle scenes on cell phones.

In 1813, the winning commander said we have met the enemy and they are ours. Which is short enough to say on Twitter. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Animals
6:43 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Woman Waits 8 Years To Get Diamond After Chicken Ate It

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. A diamond is forever, luckily, because a chicken only lasts about eight years - which is how long a woman in England is willing to wait to get back a diamond earring, after her pet chicken gulped it down while sitting on her shoulder.

The diamond earring could be removed surgically, but Claire Lennon told "The Telegraph" she worries the 6-month-old chicken wouldn't survive. And her daughter loves the bird so the diamond-wait, for the pet to die naturally.

Parallels
6:24 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Why Are U.S. Presidents Calling On The Military So Often?

U.S. forces transfer a missile for a fighter plane as the military prepared for war in Iraq, in Saudi Arabia in 1990. American presidents have been calling on the military frequently since the end of the Cold War more than two decades ago.
Gerard Fouet AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 12:22 pm

When the Cold War ended two decades ago there was a widespread belief that the greatest threat to U.S. troops would be boredom. It seemed they faced a future with little to do besides polishing their boots and staging the occasional military exercise.

Yet U.S. presidents are calling on the military more often than ever, with U.S. forces carrying out more than a dozen separate operations since the first Gulf War in Iraq in 1991.

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Business
5:29 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Will Microsoft's Nokia Deal Shake Up Mobile?

Nokia was the only large phone manufacturer in the world to commit to selling phones running Microsoft's operating system. Now Microsoft is buying Nokia's mobile phone business.
Timothy Clary AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 1:30 pm

Nokia was once the largest mobile phone manufacturer in the world, the most valuable company in Europe and an icon in its home base of Finland. But the rise of Apple and Android smartphones knocked the company on its heels.

Now comes news that Microsoft is buying Nokia's mobile phone business for $7.2 billion. NPR's Steve Henn answers some questions about the deal.

So what is Microsoft getting here?

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Politics
5:27 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Rep. Smith On Syria: What Is The Limitation Of U.S. Power?

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

Here's a simple reality of democracy. The president can ask people for support, and if they give it, he's stronger. But they can also say no. That's the reason that presidents have often launched military action without a formal vote in Congress.

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Business
5:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

New York's Dairy Farmers Squeezed By Greek Yogurt Boom

The recent yogurt boom of upstate New York has meant more jobs in places like the Chobani plant in South Edmeston, but it has not led to a bigger dairy herd in the state.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 2:01 pm

Upstate New York has lugged around the Rust Belt identity for decades now.
But today, the region is trying on a new reputation as the king of yogurt — especially the high-protein Greek yogurt that consumers crave.

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