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The Two-Way
7:13 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Navy Yard Shootings: No Second Gunman; Victims' IDs Emerge

At the White House and around the nation, flags are flying at half-staff since Monday's mass shooting at the Washington Navy Yard.
Olivier Douliery UPI/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 4:18 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Brian Naylor on the Navy Yard shootings
  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Hansi Lo Wang on the victims

Our coverage continues of Monday's shootings at the Washington Navy Yard. Twelve victims and the man who authorities say gunned them down are dead.

Some of the latest developments:

-- Investigators now do not think there was a second shooter, D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier said late Monday evening. Throughout Monday, authorities had run down witness reports and other evidence indicating there might have been additional gunmen.

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The Two-Way
7:07 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Book News: Fight Over Philosopher Ends With Gunfire In Russia

An artist's rendering of German philosopher Immanuel Kant.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 9:47 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Tue September 17, 2013

In 'Reaped,' 5 Lives That Are Far More Than Just Statistics

iStockphoto.com

On July 18, 1863, the Union Army's famed 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry — a black military unit — made a desperate assault on Confederate forces at Fort Wagner near Charleston, S.C. In the end, they were unsuccessful and lost almost half of their forces. Escaped slave-turned-abolitionist Harriet Tubman bore elegiac eyewitness to the terrible day: "We saw the lightning and that was the guns," she said later.

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Around the Nation
7:01 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Hawaiian Woman Complains Her Long Name Was Cut Off On IDs

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 9:38 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with an update on a Hawaiian woman with a very long name - Janice Lokelani Keihanaikukauakahihuliheekahaunaele. She goes by Loke, but Honolulu's KHOM2 reported on her complaint that her name was cut off on ID cards, which led to issues with travel and cops.

Now, Hawaii will expand its limit on the length of names on IDs so Loke won't need to use her maiden name - Worth.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:51 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Employee Gives School Principal Pot As A Gift

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 9:38 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

The head of a Rhode Island school was named Providence Principal of the Year, but that was only the start of the accolades. Police say an employee, Christopher Michael Sheehan, gave his boss a present to celebrate - a half ounce of marijuana. Mr. Sheehan was arrested. Just to be clear, since it can apparently be easy to forget, Rhode Island is not one of the states that has legalized pot, and especially not in a school zone.

Business
6:45 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Hello Kitty Pitches Beer

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 9:38 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Next, we go to a wildly successful Japanese export that specializes in cute. I'm talking about the white cat with a red bow and a button nose, whose image adorns everything from school supplies to rifles to RVs.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Yes, our last word in business today is: Hello Kitty - in a can.

The Japanese company Sanrio has licensed the pudgy face cartoon cat to a Taiwanese beverage maker which is selling fruit-flavored beer in China and Taiwan.

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Parallels
6:44 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Why The U.S. Needs Bashar Assad To Stay For Now

President Obama is no longer calling for the ouster of Syrian President Bashar Assad, as the U.S. presses him to dismantle his stockpile of chemical weapons. Assad is shown here on Sept. 8.
AP

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 10:57 am

Throughout the Syrian war, President Obama has insisted that President Bashar Assad must go. But now, the U.S. may want, or even need, Assad to remain in power for a while longer so he can oversee the dismantling of his chemical weapons stockpile.

"For the sake of the Syrian people, the time has come for President Assad to step aside," Obama said back on Aug. 18, 2011, in his first explicit call for Assad's ouster, something the U.S. president went on to repeat on multiple occasions.

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Around the Nation
5:43 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Probing Ties Between Mexican Cartel And Chicago's Violence

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 9:38 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Five hundred and six people were murdered in Chicago last year. It was the kind of news that got John Lippert thinking.

JOHN LIPPERT: I live in Chicago and a lot of what we get is overnight stories saying, you know, three people shot, six people shot, day after day. And I just felt like, okay, well, what does it mean? Where are we going with this?

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Analysis
5:39 am
Tue September 17, 2013

U.N. Report Doesn't Assign Blame To Syrian Chemical Attack

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 9:38 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. A report by United Nations' chemical weapons inspectors does not blame Syria's government for last month's chemical weapons attack. The inspectors were not authorized to do that. But they did provide substantial evidence, the most detailed look available, of an August 21 attack that led the United States to threaten military action.

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