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Europe
7:28 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Bear Breaks Into Siberian Cottage Devours Pot Of Borscht

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. This time it was the bear who broke in. It seemed no one was at home so a Russian bear decided to taste what was on the stove of a Siberian country cottage. Not too hot, not too cold, the pot of borscht was just right. The bear devoured the entire pot of the beet root soup before the owners spotted him, called the police, and the bear, like Goldilocks before him, fled into the forest. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
7:23 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Book News: Novel By Michael Hastings To Be Published Posthumously

Michael Hastings, who wrote a candid profile of Gen. Stanley McChrystal for Rolling Stone, died in June in a car crash in Los Angeles. He was 33.
Paul Morigi Getty Images for The Guardian

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Around the Nation
7:20 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Lights Go Out During Ravens' News Conference

A blackout delayed last season's Super Bowl as the Baltimore Ravens defeated San Francisco. As the Raven's coach was taking questions Sunday, the room was plunged into darkness. Quarterback Joe Flacco accidentally leaned on a light switch. Later, linebacker Terrell Suggs did the same thing.

The Two-Way
6:27 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Researchers From U.S., Germany, Share Nobel Prize For Medicine

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 2:42 pm

Two Americans, James Rothman and Randy Schekman, and German-born researcher Thomas Südhof have won the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for "solving the mystery of how the cell organizes its transport system," according to the Nobel committee.

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Economy
4:55 am
Mon October 7, 2013

What's The Cost Of Budget Gridlock?

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 5:33 am

Renee Montagne talks to David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal, about the cost of the government shutdown, and the dangers of the threatened government default.

Business
4:55 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Updated $100 Bill To Enter Circulation

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 7:03 am

The Federal Reserve estimates that up to two-thirds of all U.S. C -notes are circulating abroad at any given time. The bill is also the most counterfeited. Federal officials are confident the new bill will be much harder to fake.

Business
4:55 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Political Crisis Keeps Obama From Asia-Pacific Summit

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 6:20 am

Leaders of Asia-Pacific countries are wrapping up an economic summit in Indonesia. Much of the talk in the region over the weekend focused on the event's big no show: President Obama. Because of the partial government shutdown in the U.S., the president decided to stay at home and monitor developments.

Business
4:55 am
Mon October 7, 2013

A Gain For Airbus Is A Loss For Boeing

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 6:41 am

Japan Airlines has announced it's ordering 31 wide-body jets from Europe's major airplane manufacturer. It's a deal worth $9.5 billion. It's a huge sale for Airbus and a big blow for America's Boeing, which for decades has dominated sales to Japanese airlines.

Around the Nation
4:55 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Labor-Starved Pear Farmers Buckle Under Bumper Crop

Some of this season's Comice pear harvest is rotting in Pacific Northwest orchards because there aren't enough workers to pick it.
Deena Prichep for NPR

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 1:12 pm

It's always a bit sad to say goodbye to summer corn and tomatoes, and settle into fall.

There are consolations, though — like the new crop of pears. Over 80 percent of America's fresh pears are grown in the Pacific Northwest, and this year's harvest is slated to be one of the biggest on record.

But some of the fruit is rotting in the orchards because there aren't enough workers to pick them.

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Middle East
4:55 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Deadly Street Battles Raged Across Egypt

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 5:23 am

More than 50 people are dead after security forces and Islamist protesters clashed. Supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi and backers of the military that deposed him poured into the streets and turned on each other. Sunday's death toll was the highest on a single day since Aug. 14 when security forces raided two sit-in protest camps by Morsi supporters, killing hundreds.

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