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11:20 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Latino Hackers: Encouraging Innovation

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 2:03 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

So we've been talking about science and getting people excited about science. You've probably already heard that Latinos are more likely to use social media sites and to access the Internet from mobile devices than other groups are. But the number of Latinos involved in developing the technology is not where many people would like it to be. Hispanics only make up about 4 percent of the people working in the computer industry, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

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Science
11:20 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Why Is The Higgs Boson A 'Big Whoop' For All Of Us?

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 2:03 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We've talked before on this program about why Latinos in the U.S. are more likely to tweet and use other social media than other Americans. Today, we're going to hear from a Latino tech leader who wants to boost the Latino presence in the science and business of technology. We'll talk about that in just a few minutes.

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Monkey See
11:16 am
Thu October 10, 2013

The Tribe Has Broken: How Sexism Is Silently Killing 'Survivor'

Brad Culpepper heads up a group of bro-dudes with little patience for women on this season's Survivor.
Monty Brinton CBS

This piece contains information about Wednesday night's episode.

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Music Reviews
11:14 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Two Bluegrass Truths From James King And Alan Jackson

James King.
Julie Lilliard King Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 1:13 pm

On Three Chords and the Truth, bluegrass musician James King picks from the canon of country music to rearrange its songs as bluegrass. On The Bluegrass Album, country star Alan Jackson has recorded his first collection of bluegrass music — some classics, some originals.

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The Government Shutdown
11:12 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Boehner Proposes 6-Week Increase In Debt Limit

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

Seven days from now - according to the U.S. Treasury Department - the U.S. approaches the point where it can no longer pay its bills. The federal budget deficit has been dropping dramatically. But in the wake of the Great Recession, it is still very high.

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Parallels
11:03 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Will A Pakistani Teenager Win The Nobel Peace Prize?

Malala Yousafzai, 16, speaks in New York last month. Yousafzai was shot a year ago by the Taliban for her outspoken advocacy in favor of girls' education in Pakistan. She is considered one of the favorites for the Nobel Peace Prize, which will be announced Friday.
Ramin Talaie Getty Images

It hasn't been a great year for peace. War is raging in Syria, grinding conflicts drag on in Afghanistan and Iraq, and assorted insurgencies plague nations from Asia to Africa.

Yet the Nobel Peace Prize will be announced Friday, and one of the favorites would be a striking choice: Malala Yousafzai, the 16-year-old schoolgirl who was shot by the Taliban last year for her outspoken advocacy of girls' education in her native Pakistan.

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Parallels
10:58 am
Thu October 10, 2013

In Israel, The Mystery Of Postage Stamps That Don't Add Up

In Israel, the price of sending mail overseas has dropped recently.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 1:40 pm

We had a complicated problem on our kitchen table in Jerusalem. A stack of homemade birthday thank-you notes, tucked in brightly colored envelopes, ready to be whisked off to friends in the U.S. And a commemorative packet of Israeli stamps in all sorts of different denominations, none of which added up to the 6.20 NIS (6 New Israeli Shekels, 20 agorot, or $1.74) it took to mail a letter or postcard from here to the States.

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The Two-Way
9:43 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Malala Yousafzai Awarded Sakharov Prize

Malala Yousafzai addresses students and faculty after receiving the 2013 Peter J. Gomes Humanitarian Award at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., last month.
Jessica Rinaldi AP

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 1:33 pm

Pakistani teenager Malala Yousafzai, who was shot last year by Taliban militants for her advocacy of girls' education, has been awarded the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought by European lawmakers.

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The Two-Way
9:10 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Weekly Unemployment Claims Spike; Shutdown Gets Some Blame

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 1:36 pm

First-time claims for unemployment insurance were up sharply to 374,000 from 308,000 the week before, the Employment and Training Administration reported Thursday.

The increase for the week ending Oct. 5 is a departure from a trend in recent weeks that was lower than at any time since the spring of 2007, before the onset of the recession.

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It's All Politics
8:54 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Thursday Morning Political Mix

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and a sign of the times.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 9:02 am

Good morning, fellow political junkies. It's Day 10 of the federal government's partial shutdown. And while it's a dreary, rainy day in Washington, there did appear to be more glimmers of hope this morning than in recent days.

Today's theme is movement, as in, there seem to be some tentative steps towards resolving the current fiscal impasse as President Obama and House Republicans are scheduled to meet at the White House later Thursday.

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